Monthly Archives: June 2016

Getting Back to the Basics this 4th of July

By: Kelly Lopresti, Director of Child Development, The Lily Garden Child Care Center

The warm summer weather is perfect for a Fourth of July celebration that incorporates easy patriotic activities. Think back to your own childhood outdoor experiences in the summer months with nights playing kick the can and flashlight tag.  4thWe can show our kids how to have a great 4th of July celebration by adding a few throw back activities from our youth.  Below is a list of list of easy activities that will keep kids busy, laughing and having a ton of fun during your holiday weekend.

Potato Sack Race: Bring back the classic potato sack race for your Fourth of July party. All you’ll need is a handful of bags (even old pillow cases will work) and a group of people. Line up the bagged participants and send them on their way laughing toward the finish line.

brady bunch sack race.png
Fun with the Brady Bunch kids.

Fun Tip: Choose festive bags, such as red, white, and blue pillow cases, or decorate your own potato sacks with the image of the flag or the Statue of Liberty.

IMG_1410Spoon Race: We named this Fourth of July game for one of our nation’s founding fathers, and it’s sure to be a hit. It’s the Abraham Lincoln Spoon Race.

  1. Divide the kids into two teams and designate a starting point and finish line.
  2. At the starting point, place a bowl of pennies and two spoons or ladles (one for each team); at the finish line, place two empty bowls (one for each team).
  3. One at a time one person from each team must fill the spoon with as many pennies as possible and then race to the finish line to discard them into the team bowl.
  4. Here’s the catch: Any dropped pennies must be picked up and returned to the spoon, and the player must return to the starting point. The first team to transfer all the pennies to the bowl at the finish line wins.
small-american-flags-on-wooden-sticks-5_161
Photo from Oriental Trading

American Flag Relay: Fill two large plastic buckets or bins with sand and insert small American flags. Use the same number of flags as participants.

  1. Designate a starting point and a finish line, placing the buckets at the finish line.
  2. Split the kids into two teams and have them form two lines at the starting point.
  3. On your “Go,” the first person in each line races to the bucket, grabs a flag, and marches back (for safety reasons, don’t allow children to run with the flags).
  4. The next person in line cannot go until the previous person has returned with his or her flag.
  5. The first team to capture all of its flags wins.

 

Other ideas:

  • Bike Decorating contest: Get the streamers and balloons ready and start decorating.
  • Hula Hoop Contest: Grab some Hula Hoops and a few wiggly participants to get the contest started. The person who can continue to hula the longest wins.
  • Baseball Throwing Contest: Incorporate America’s favorite pastime in your 4th of July celebration. The person who can throw a baseball the farthest wins. This game is best played at a park with an adult marking the distance each time.
  • Tug-of-War Contest: Create two teams to tug on opposing sides of a rope. Make three knots in the middle of the rope and a line on the ground between the teams. The team who tugs the furthest knot across the line wins
  • kiteFly a Kite: Let your patriotic spirit fly high into the sky this July Fourth. Make and decorate kites as a family and fly them in the backyard or at a park.
  • Baseball: Baseball is widely considered the all-American sport, which makes it a perfect Fourth of July game. Designate team captains and mark bases with bags of sand or painted twigs.
  • Patriotic Scavenger Hunt: For a festive and fun July Fourth game, send players on a scavenger hunt around the neighborhood. Include patriotic items on the list, such as red, white, and blue items; a nickel, in honor of Thomas Jefferson, who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and mini American flags.

For more ideas for a fun 4th of July weekend visit:

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s Lily Garden Child Care Center visit eastersealslilygarden.org.

Advertisements

Communicative Temptation: Arranging Your Environment Can Get Your Child Talking!

By: Jennifer Tripoli, M.S., CCC-SLP

Communicative temptation is a speech therapy technique I use consistently during my sessions with children who are late to talk. It is an easy strategy that can be implemented across environments, not just in therapy! Communicative temptation was coined in 1989 by Wetherby and Prizant in order to use a creatively engineered environment to facilitate communication in young children.

In short, communicative temptations are what they sound like. You are going to tempt or entice your child to communicate by setting up your environment in a specific way. Sometimes we do not give late talkers a chance or an opportunity to learn/use communication. Not because we do not want them to talk, but more so because we anticipate their needs way too frequently.

Is your child ever struggling to open a container full of a preferred food and you jump in and open it for them? Do you ever anticipate the type of snack your child would like without allowing them to tell you? Are all of your child’s preferred toys in reach? Here are a few examples of ways you can tempt your child to communicate! 

  • Placing a highly preferred toy or food item out of reach for the child. Key is in sight but out of reach!
  • Placing highly preferred objects inside a clear plastic container that the child cannot open on their own
  • Placing a lock on a cabinet door where a preferred object is located
  • Eat a desired object in front of the child but don’t offer it to them
  • Take the batteries out of a preferred toy and wait for the child to communicate the toy is not working properly
  • Initiate a reciprocal interaction game such as “peekaboo”, then stop and wait
  • Blow bubbles with the child a few times then place the bubbles out of reach or hand the child the bubbles container without the wand
  • Push the child on the swing a few times and then stop
  • Block the entrance of the slide they want to go down
  • Change a familiar routine

Hopefully these examples, will allow you to think of other creative ways to engineer your home, daycare, toy room, etc. to allow for more communicative opportunities! The outcome is not always “talking”, it can be ANY type of communication! A gesture (e.g.

Nicholas_T
Photo by: Christine Carroll

pointing or reaching), a facial expression, a word, a phrase, etc.! The key here is WAITING. Often times, we do not give children who are learning language enough time to communicate. We jump in quickly and eliminate that opportunity to communicate independently.

Depending on your child’s language level you may need to model what is expected first (a gesture, a word, etc.). For example, if a child is attempting to open a locked cabinet you may first need to model the word “open” and then slowly fade this model. You eventually hope that the child will independently use the word after they are “tempted.”

Take a quick look at your home today. How can you make a few small changes to facilitate communication in your environment? How you can change how you interact with your child to increase communicative opportunity?

For more information about our speech services and other programs at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, click here.

A Super Sensory Summer

By: Laura Bueche MOT OTR/L

Summertime is the best time for some creative sensory play outside. Your child will have a blast learning and exploring with these sensory summer activities that won’t break the bank.

IDEAS TO INSPIRE YOUR LITTLE SPROUT

Garden Party!

Fill a tub with soil. Hide plastic bugs, coins, or dinosaurs.
Use shovels or hands to find the treasures.

sand.png

Paint pots, plant seeds and watch them grow.
Overturn rocks to search for bugs and worms… or play with fake worms. Recipe here.

plant.png

worm.png_w.png
Photo Credit: Learning4kids.net

Is real mud a difficult texture for your little one?  Start with “ghost mud”.
Recipe here

sand_.png
Photo Credit: TreeHouseTV.com

Make a Splash with these Water Activities

Water Fun!

Fill a tub with water beads and ocean animals for an awesome, hands-on aquarium.

sa.png

 

 

 

 
Freeze toy animals, foam puzzle pieces, or pretend jewelry in ice. Have your kiddos use squeeze bottles, and eye droppers of warm water to get them out. Instructions here.

fs.png
Photo Credit: LittleBinsForLittlehands.com

Green gross swamp sensory table. Recipe here.

fsdfs.png
Photo Credit: NoTimeForFlashCards.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shaving Cream Car wash. Recipe here.

sdfgdsgdgdf
Photo Credit: TreeHouseTV.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s go to the Beach!

Feel the sand between your toes with these fun tactile activities.

Sand Slime. It’s ooey, it’s gooey…and sandy? Recipe: Here

sgghgfd
Photo Credit: GrowingAJeweledRose.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drawing letters in the sand, a perfect pairing of visual motor and tactile. Recipe here.

qwq
Photo Credit: AnyGivenMoment.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kinetic Sand…semi sticky, and super moldable sand. Get it here.

sdfsd.png

 

 

 

 

 

Good old sand box play…because nothing beats the classic, pale and shovel.

For more summer sensory ideas, or ways to adapt these activities to your child’s needs and goals, ask your occupational therapist at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley. For more information about occupational therapy visit our website.

Have a great summer!

 

Budget Impasse Approaches Second Year

Yesterday, the State of Illinois entered its 12th month without a a budget, and legislature finished the official spring session without progress.

Today we revisit Scott Kuczynski’s January post to help understand the budget stalemate, and review the United Way of Illinois’ most recent snapshot.  Updates to the January survey results are expected soon, as human service agencies continue to feel the impact of the budget impasse.

UWI-Budget-Survey-Results-page-001

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley remains committed to continuing services, though the budget stalemate continues to impact families and human services throughout Illinois.