Monthly Archives: September 2016

Motivation Comes From Seeing Your Future Self

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons M.S. CCC-SLP

We all have a range in abilities of executive functioning.  Kids and adults alike can struggle with organization, memory, focus, managing time, initiating a task and completing a task.

Being able to visualize the future is an imperative skill for moving from event to event and showing up on time with the needed materials.

Some of our kids who struggle with executive functioning may seem distracted, disorganized and struggling to keep up with the pace of the day.

Additionally, some of these kids can be perceived as being unmotivated.   They might be smart kids that simply don’t appear driven to work up to their potential.  Executive functioning guru, Sarah Ward, asserts that these kids have difficulty imagining their future emotions.  They don’t intuitively imagine what they will feel like or what they will look like when they complete a task or achieve a goal.

first-blog-picturesecond-blog-pictureJorge on bike.jpg

What I need to look like now.                                   So that I can look like this later.

We want kids to be able to see the future, say the future, feel the future and plan for the future.  So how can we facilitate this skill of ‘future imagery thinking’?

  • Have your child make an image by helping them talk through the following:
    • What will the environment look like?
    • Who else do you see being there?
    • What will I look like?
    • What will I feel like?
  • Ask questions that encourage future imagery thinking.
    • Ask:  “When you walk into class tomorrow, what do you see yourself handing to your teacher?”
      • Instead of:  “What do you have for homework tonight?”
    • Ask: “What would you look like if you were standing by the door, ready to leave for soccer?”
      • Instead of: “Go get ready for soccer.”

Making a mental movie of the future requires us to actively think through the necessary steps in order to complete a task.  It enables us to envision and play a ‘dry run’ of a task without the risk of error.  Seeing the future helps us to persist through the present challenge in order to achieve our goals.

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage and Fox Valley programs, visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

 

Featured image by: Lauren Sims

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Getting Ready For Fall by Teaching Your Child to Dress a Coat

By: Maureen Karwowski, OT

As the leaves begin to turn, it will soon be time to break out those sweaters and coats. This is a great time for your child to practice dressing their coat independently.

As an occupational therapist, I am always looking for ways to help my clients reach their maximum independence. As children become more independent, they develop more confidence and are more likely to try other challenges as well. For my clients that have fine motor difficulties, practicing dressing skills is a natural and routine way to help them develop their fine motor abilities.  Independence with dressing occurs one step at a time, so we can start with dressing a coat as the first step.

Once a child is able to stand securely, or sit securely if they have postural difficulties, it is a good time to start. Here is the “over the head” method that I would start with:

  1. Place the coat on the floor or a low table
  2. Lay the coat flat with the inside facing up
  3. Stand facing the top or collar of the coat
  4. Bend over and place the arms in the sleeves
  5. Lift the entire coat up and overhead
  6. When the arms come down you are all set!

Zipping up a coat requires more precise fine motor skills and strength. I would start by having the child zip up the coat once you have engaged the zipper. When assisting your child with any fasteners, always stand behind them to give them perspective on how their hands should work. You can use a zipper pull to make it easier for your child to grasp the zipper. A quick online search yields many cute options, but you can also use a key ring that you have at home. A magnetic zipper is also a nice alternative while your child is working on manipulating a zipper. Several clothing companies offer this.

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It is important to assist your child, while not jumping in too soon. Be sure to leave extra time, and focus on one step at a time. Once they are independent with this, then you can focus on promoting another dressing task. Good luck and stay warm!

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley occupational therapy services, visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

Help children receive the nutritional therapy they need!

By: Cindy Baranoski, MS, RDN, LDN – Pediatric Nutrition Therapist

Excellent nutrition is one of the most basic requirements for a child to grow and thrive. A study published by Pediatrics found that diagnosis-specific, structured approaches to nutrition issues among children with developmental disabilities significantly improved energy consumption and nutritional status. Yet, nutrition disorders and compromised nutritional status are very frequent among children with developmental disabilities. fun-with-food-054

Research shows that as many as 90% of children with a developmental disorder have at least one nutrition risk indicator. Nutrition problems can include failure to thrive, obesity, poor feeding skills, sensory disorders, and gastrointestinal disorders, to name only a few. Individuals with special needs are also more likely to develop co-existing medical conditions that require nutrition interventions.

Thanks to two significant grants from Hanover Township Mental Health Board and Special Kids Foundation, Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley can now offer nutrition services for children, regardless of insurance, in areas currently underserved immediately north and west of DuPage County. This includes full financial support for those uninsured, underinsured or on Medicaid; and partial support for those in Early Intervention or with insurance. Children who qualify will receive a nutrition evaluation and follow up nutrition therapy as needed.

Qualifications for children (birth to 21 years of age) to receive this service include:

  • Eligible medical diagnosis or identified eating concern  AND

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley Nutrition Therapy provides care that is difficult to find elsewhere in a community or medical setting. Training and specialties include assisting children with improved oral and digestive tolerance, modifications to help improve growth,  adjusting diet for improved variety, volume and complexity of foods and fluids, balancing the diet of those with food allergies or sensitivities, help with transitioning (off of or onto) a tube feeding, and homemade blenderized formula and diet modifications.
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Evaluations are performed at the Center, in the family’s home or community setting. Our goal is to provide optimal nutrition care to children with developmental disabilities through an inter-disciplinary approach, addressing their nutrition risks and disorders and helping them to lead healthier lives.

Please refer parents, other specialists or anyone else with questions about the program to our Nutrition Therapy intake coordinator, Christy Stringini, who can be reached at 630-261-6126 and cstringini@EasterSealsDFVR.org.

Learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley nutritional therapy and feeding clinic at www.eastersealsdfvr.org.

New Models of Patient Care

liuBy Dr. Ingrid Liu, D.O.

Who can keep track of all this? How are the independently insured going to get medical care?

Doctors are not happy and neither are patients. I have colleagues that have decided to stop patient care completely, changing to new careers in consulting, research, entering early retirement (if that’s an option), or any number of non medical options.

Unfortunately there are only so many hours in a day and insurance plans only pay so much for each office visit (no matter how much premiums cost or how much doctors beg and plead). A physician has to see on average 30 patients/day in order to succeed. This therefore translates to 10-15 minutes per patient in a 8 hour day. This, as we know, is not good for either the physician or the patient.

When physicians spend more time with each patient, we get to know them each individually and thoroughly, allowing for better decisions and treatment plans as well as guidance on preventive measures.

wellcomemdPrimary care physicians are changing their practices to offer patients options.  I am a family medicine physician and I switched my practice to a membership model 2 years ago. This has been called concierge medicine but I prefer to call it old fashioned medical care in today’s healthcare system. By limiting the number of patients under my care, I am not only able to address more questions from the patients, but my office staff also assists with coordinating care from specialists. We also assist in navigating this complicated insurance maze.

Because the health insurance policies are so complicated, another model that now exists is called Direct Primary Care, or DPC. This type of practice charges a small membership fee and does not accept any health insurance contracts, charging patients a set fee for services, similar to a menu at a restaurant or items at the auto repair shop. There are only a few of these practices nationwide but are growing in numbers.

Especially in this election year, health care reform continues to be a hot topic and I’m not writing to express my point of view other than that change needs to happen and is happening. There is growing concern over a shortage of primary care physicians. Please ask your family physician or pediatrician how he/she is doing. You may be surprised to hear the answer. I know the question would be welcomed and appreciated (as long as there’s time during the appointment to ask it)!

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Liu has provided family medical care for thousands of patients of all ages over two decades. She is board-certified in family practice and licensed without restrictions. She currently serves on the board of Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley and is also a member of the Illinois Academy of Family Practice Committee on Mental Health. Dr. Liu is proficient in all aspects of primary care, but holds special interests in women’s health and travel medicine. http://www.wellcomemd.com/. Learn more about her practice in the video below.