Screen Time: What is too much?

By: Cassidy McCoy, PT

Over the past few years, computers, tablets, phones, and TV seem to have taken over. Technology has begun to change the way our children interact with each other and us. However, how much time spent on these devices is considered too much?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released new recommendation for children’s media use.

The recommendations include:

  • <18 months: Avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting.
  • 18 to 24 months: If you want to introduce digital media, choose high-quality programming. Also, watch it with your children to help them understand what they’re seeing.
  • 2 to 5 years: Limit your children’s screen use to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs. You should watch it with them to help them understand what they are seeing and apply it to the world around them.boy-learning-with-therapist
  • 6 and older: Place consistent limits on the time spent using media, the types of media, and make sure media does not take the place of adequate sleep, physical activity and other behaviors essential to health.

What are the potential effects of too much screen time?

  • Obesity: Too much screen time equates to more time spent in sedentary positioning resulting in decreased physical activity and weight gain. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend for children to get at least 60 minutes of active play daily.
  • Sleep: Devices emit a blue light that mimics daylight, which stimulates you, leading to irregular sleep schedules and shorter duration of sleep with use of a device before bedtime.
  • Behavioral problems and violence: Screen time can be an effective way to calm down, but it should not be the only way they learn to calm down. Children should learn how to identify and handle strong emotions and come up with ways to manage them (such as deep breathing or problem solving)
  • Loss of social skills: Face-to-face communication or “talk time” is critical for language development. Research has shown that it’s that “back-and-forth conversation” that improves language skills—much more so than “passive” listening or one-way interaction with a screen.

What can you to to help?

  • Set time limits and expectations
  • Create “tech free zones” such a dinner table or bedrooms
  • Use screen time to promote education and development by utilizing appropriate programming.

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