Monthly Archives: June 2017

Why Medicaid Cuts Matter

By: Theresa Forthofer, CEO & President

The new healthcare legislation, Better Care Reconciliation Act, is everywhere in the news. With our current political climate, you may want to just ignore it and turn off the TV.

Please don’t ignore the impact this legislation will have on you or someone close to you.

Currently 60 percent of children and adults with disabilities use Medicaid. It also pays for nearly half of all births in the United States and 40 percent of children are covered through Medicaid. This bill would cause each state to have to find more money to decrease the gap from these federal cuts. Without a budget in Illinois, we can take a guess on how the state will make up this difference. Under the proposed Senate bill, the Congressional Budget Office estimates that 22 million people would lose coverage by 2026.

Medicaid

ryan and justinThis will greatly impact you or a friend or neighbor. It impacts my family, as my adult sons, Ryan and Justin have Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy and Autism and receive Medicaid funded home-based services. These services have helped my family immensely and have become vital for us, and I know they are vital for many of the families we serve at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley.  Supporting children in their early years will save the system significantly more as they age.  The expense is far less than having to provide life-long care outside the home.

This proposed bill is making health care more expensive to those who need it most – like low-income families and people with disabilities.

Help your child or other children and adults with disabilities. I urge you to tell Congress #NoCutsNoCaps on #Medicaid. It is easy to do by following these steps on this link. 

  • call-script-for-medicaid.pngSearch for a Senator
  • Call the number listed by their name and ask for the relevant health legislative assistant.
  • Use the provided call script to guide your conversation.
  • Optional: Refer to additional talking points provided here
  • Share this page and image on Facebook to spread the word

 

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Begin to Bike

By: Cassidy McCoy PT, DPT

Summer is a great time of year to get back on your bike.  Here are a few key concepts to help your child ditch the training wheels!

The key to learning how to balance and ride on a two-wheeled bike is to ensure proper stability at the trunk, allowing your child to move their arms and legs freely for steering and pedaling.  Here are some tips to help bring the physical components of bike riding all together.

  1. Balance bike
    1. A balance bike is a bike with no pedals. A balance bike can be purchased, or balance bikeyou can simply remove the pedals from your child’s current bike until they get the hang of it.
    2. First, start with having your child sit on the bike, lower the seat so their feet touch the ground. Have them walk the bike with their feet to begin to learn how to balance without training wheels.
    3. As this gets easier, progress to using both feet at the same time to push the bike and pick their feet up off the floor to glide while maintaining their balance.
  2. Catching themselves
    1. Another way to work on balance is to teach your kids how to catch themselves by placing their foot down when they feel like they are tipping over. Hold the bike stationary for you child as they place both feet on the pedals. Let go of the bike, allowing it to fall to one side or the other. Your child should place their foot down in order to catch their balance.
  3. Steering
    1. Using cones or other objects, set up a pattern for your child to steer around. This can be done with a balance bike while scooting/walking it through or with pedaling if your child has mastered their balance.IMG_5042
  4. Start to Pedal
    1. When your child is ready to pedal, have them start standing with their feet flat on the floor. Have them lift one foot onto the pedal that is lifted at around 2-3 o’clock. As they push down on the pedal to get the bike going, they will lift their other foot onto the other pedal and push down to maintain momentum. If needed, you can help steady the bike by gently placing your hands on your child’s shoulder or the bike seat.

 

Bonus Pro Tip:

tricycleAvoid the discomfort of hunching over to push young riders along on their tricycles. Lace a sturdy rope around the bike’s structure, careful to avoid the spokes and pedals.  This allows you to help pull the trike along, adjusting the resistance to match the child’s ability.

 

Remember to always practice safe cycling. Wear a helmet, and obey the rules of the road.

 

Help your child develop their cycling skills at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s Bike for the Kids on Sunday, September 17 in Elgin, IL.  This long-distance bike ride includes a 2.5 mile family ride, pedal parade and kid-friendly entertainment!

To learn more about Physical Therapy programs to improve strength, balance and coordination at at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit:
http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/physical-therapy.html

 

Executive Functioning Skills: CO-OP Model Part 3: Time Robbers

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

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I was recently asked by a parent to elaborate more on a concept I integrate within GoalPlanDoCheck called “time robbers”.  The concept of “time robbers” was first introduced to me at a continuing education class taught by speech therapist Sarah Ward. A “time robber” is something which keeps us from doing other things which have more value or importance to us.

The concept of “time robbers” can be a fun way to call to attention all the little (or maybeclock not so little) things we do that take away from our goal. Time robbers can occur to everyone. They can occur anywhere. They can also be anything. Time robbers can be things we do as well as things other people do. Sometimes time robbers are imposed upon us by others or circumstances and are less in our control. Other time robbers are self-inflicted. Some examples of time robbers are being hungry, tired, or worried. They can also be sounds in our environment, noises/shows on the television, or games on the iPad.

The following is a handout I developed to help introduce the concept to children.

What? Time robbers are a little like impulses. Impulses are the feelings we have to do or say something…sometimes without even realizing! Time robbers are just like impulses. They are the things that we do that take away time from our overall goal and plan.
When? Time robbers can happen all the time. They don’t have to be limited to just school or home.
Examples? Time robbers can come in all forms. They might as easy as a thought that should remain in my thought bubble or as complicated as getting your bike out, riding to the store, buying a snack, and returning home to finish your homework. Other examples can be having the television on when doing homework, wanting to play longer with a favorite toy, arguing, changing ideas, etc.
Consequences? Time robbers are not our friends. They take away time from us getting things done. If they take away from one thing it means there is less time to do something that might be more preferred or fun.
How to fix? Practice your thought bubbles and keeping any time robbers hidden away inside our brains until we are finished with our goal and initial plan. STOP and Think – monitor your space, time, objects, and people. Think if this is an expected time to bring up your time robber.

13_Calvin_Calforio

When beginning any new strategy or tool with your child, I often find it helpful to first identify in yourself examples and then start calling attention to different tools you use to help defeat the different time robbers. When your child is starting to recognize time robbers, then it is a good time to introduce the concept to your child to help identify and address them.

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s occupational therapy services visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

 

The Magic of Disney and your Special Needs Child

Guest Blogger: Michele Boroughf, Renee’s Mom

Michele is the mom of an 11-year-old daughter with special needs.  She is always seeking out fun activities and adapting them to create new experiences for Renee and her family. She shares how she planned an accessible and memorable Disney vacation.


I won’t deny that for the longest time as a parent of a special needs daughter, I had put off a trip to Disney World. Why?  I said to myself, how could she enjoy the rides?  How would she manage the travel?  How would she do in the heat?  She has seizures!  How will we manage?  Well this past May we went on a family trip to Disney.  First & foremost was to honor the memory of my Dad who was such a fan of Mickey.  My mother has had this on her bucket list for some time now and all the stars were aligned this May that eight members of our family decided to make the trek to Disney.

I’m happy to say our family survived the trip.  Disney was magical for so many reasons, but for our family it has a different meaning.

I have a friend who summed it up best.  Disney’s motto (although not official and appears nowhere in print).  “It’s not our fault, but it is our problem”.  Disney bent over backwards in every way to ensure our trip was not only enjoyable, but memorable.

Why is it magical?  Because I have never been on a vacation where everyone is NICE!  Not just nice, but pleasant, cordial, and can’t do enough to help you.  Assistance is everywhere!

So here are a few helpful hints for those of you who might be considering a visit to this magical place:

  1. Traveling with a wheelchair? No problem!  The bus transportation for Disney on the property provides two spaces for a wheelchair and scooter.  There are retractable seats.  There’s a handicapped lane for boarding.  You’re accommodated first on every single occasion.  If it’s overlooked, just pleasantly bring it to your bus driver’s attention.  And everyone else has to wait until you’re accommodated.
  1. The Monorail also has a separate boarding line for those in a wheelchair or scooter. They even pull out a ramp for easy boarding.  You’re first yet again!
  1. With regards to accommodations, we stayed at Art of Animation in a family suite and we set up a mattress on the floor to accommodate Renee’s need for sleeping.
  1. Groceries? Who needs special food?  We do!  Coconut milk is what she drinks.  And I was able to find an online grocery store that delivers right to the Bell Hop at the hotel.  Order early enough and you qualify for a discount.  Not only will they deliver to the hotel, they’ll actually put the groceries in your room and perishables in your fridge.  Our mini refrigerator and microwave helped with feeding her daily meals.  Did I mention wine?  Yep, they have that too!  gardengrocer.com
  1. For our family, meal plans don’t work for us. But for a lot of people they do.  Either you’re all on a plan or you’re not.  May was still a very hot month for our daughter and what we learned is we need to go earlier in the season.  At best, create an itinerary so that a sit down meal can be experienced at lunch & dinner which allows time for your special needs child who’s sensitive to the heat index a time to cool off inside.
  1. By using the Disney app on your phone you can avoid wait times for dinner by booking ahead! Definitely do this!  This gets you in and seated right away.
  1. You already know that your child might not be able to keep up with a busy schedule. So check out booking fastpass+ early in the morning hours.  Your options are to cool off with lunch indoors or perhaps head back to the pool to cool off.
  1. Our visit to Magic Kingdom resulted in a trip to the Emergency Quick Care. With a personal escort from the Castle’s Princess Breakfast straight to the walk-in clinic.  Thanks to the heat, Renee suffered from dehydration.  They offered us a private room without hesitation to cool her off and use it as long we needed it.
  1. No matter where we dined, all we had to say was “wheelchair accommodation” on the app and they gladly accommodated.
  1. Lastly, we needed an emergency run to a CVS Pharmacy for Renee. We have no car!  Were on Disney property…what to do?  Call UBER!  Yes, UBER picked up my husband in minutes to take him to the CVS in downtown Disney area.  Just load the UBER app on your iphone, and you’re good to go!

I’m so very happy we finally made this journey and we look forward to our return soon.  The time spent with family and Renee with her cousins are priceless.  Would we change some things? Absolutely, but I say find the itinerary that works for your family.  But know that it will be magical for your family because nowhere else on earth will someone go to the ends of the earth to make sure you’re are one hundred percent happy.  I hope these tips are helpful to you.  My biggest lesson is it doesn’t have to be perfect, but just learn to live in the moment!  Good luck to you on your travels!  May you enjoy every minute of the magic!


The social services staff at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley can recommend resources and pointers to help you plan your family’s next trip.  Click here to get in touch.