Monthly Archives: April 2018

Improve Children’s Handwriting

By: Laura Van Zandt, MS, OTR/L

There are many reasons children are referred to occupational therapy, but one of the most common, especially for school-age children, is because of difficulties with handwriting. Expectations for handwriting increase quickly between grades.

In most preschools, handwriting is done through more hands-on activities (think playing with play dough or using a paint brush). Then in kindergarten, children are expected to be able to write. By first and second grade, they are expected to write for longer periods of time with accuracy.

Many of the children we see as Occupational Therapists are able to write, but might have concerns with proximal stability (think core and shoulder strength), endurance, or have an inefficient grip on their writing instruments that may lead to messy handwriting. Other reasons might also be related to vision or sensory processing.

NicholasBelow are a few tools for children to help their hands for strength, endurance, and grasp.

Some things to keep in mind when picking out writing tools for children:

  • The smaller the writing instrument is, the more likely it is to encourage a tripod-like grasp (you may need to build up the handle to encourage)
  • For kids with decreased grasp strength, drawing and coloring with markers or gel crayons may be easier and decrease frustration when presented with more challenging activities
  • Work on a vertical surface whenever possible. It’s not only great for working on increasing upper extremity and core strength, it encourages wrist extension which is important for proper grasp on writing instruments

Squiggle pen

squiggle

Who doesn’t remember this pen from their childhood!? The Squiggle Wiggle Writer is a vibrating pen that produces squiggly lines. It comes with 3 interchangeable pens which slide in and out of the tip of the pen (which is great for working on bilateral coordination). The vibration is great for providing children with sensory input while drawing or writing which helps with focus and attention.

Mechanical pencils

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Picture by: www.raymondgeddes.com

I am a huge fan of using mechanical pencils with children because it helps them work on grading the pressure they use when writing. If you press too hard, the tip will break which gets frustrating after a few tries.

 

Twist and Write Pencil

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This pencil was designed for a child’s hand. The Y design not only encourages a child to utilize a tripod grasp, but it also forces them to use less pressure allowing them to write for longer periods of time without tiring.

 

Small Pencils, Broken Crayons

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I always have a collection of 1/2 pencils to use with the kids. The shorter a pencil, the more likely they are to use a proper grasp.

 

Beginning Writers

palm eggs

Crayola has launched a handful of new products meant just for little hands. These egg-shaped crayons are the perfect size and shape for your little artist. There are many benefits of children drawing at an early age including developing fine motor and grasping skills, encourages creativity and imagination, improves hand-eye coordination and bilateral coordination.

If you have an easel, I highly recommend having even the youngest of artists to use that because working on a vertical surface is great for kids of all ages. Working on a vertical surface helps increase core and upper extremity strength while encouraging proper wrist position, head and neck position, promotes bilateral coordination, and crossing midline skills.

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Stylus

 

pexels-photo-416396.jpegFor a variety of reasons, kids spend more time on tablets these days. As with all things, as long as you don’t overdo it, working on the iPad can provide a lot of benefits. One of the things I recommend to all parents is that if they are going to let their kids use an iPad or other kind of tablet, be sure to have them use a stylus as much as possible to help develop fine motor and grasping skills. I think this is especially important if your child is doing any kind of handwriting or drawing apps. There are a lot of different stylus’ to choose.

 

Sidewalk Chalk or Small Chalk Pieces

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One of my favorite outdoor activity is drawing with chalk.

 

Learning Without Tears Flip Crayons

flip crayons
Photo by: therapro.com

This is one great product. The crayons are already nice and small to encourage a tripod grasp and having a different color on each end encourages in-hand manipulation skills.

 

Triangle Shapes

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Triangle shapes are perfect to encourage the use of just your first three fingers.

Forbidden Tools

window crayons  bathtub crayons

Who doesn’t like the power of doing something forbidden like writing on windows or in the bathtub! These special items from crayola are designed to encourage writing and creativity is a fun way but also keep mom and dad’s sanity with easier clean up!

For more information on occupational therapy services at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

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Techniques of Occupational Therapy: Integrated Manual Therapy

Editor’s Note: Janet Mroz serves on the Occupational Therapy team at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley. She has been an occupational therapist for over 30 years and below are excerpts from a couple interviews about her work.

Janet Mroz.jpgWithin the field of Occupational Therapy there are a variety of techniques offered. The sciences are constantly evolving, which makes the profession fascinating and fun, especially for those who enjoy learning about one of the most complicated objects, the brain.

Circumstances in a person’s life can lead them to different areas of the journey. Janet was introduced to alternative medicine because of a significant car accident she faced.  Due to the injuries sustained and because traditional medicine did not resolve her medical issues, she was lead down the path of alternative medicine. At the Upledger Institute she learned about Cranial Sacral Therapy (CST) and studied the program for multiple years.

Upledger Institute says “CST is a gentle, hands-on method of evaluating and enhancing the functioning of a physiological body system called the craniosacral system – comprised of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord.

Using a soft touch generally no greater than 5 grams, or about the weight of a nickel, practitioners release restrictions in the craniosacral system to improve the functioning of the central nervous system.

By complementing the body’s natural healing processes, CST is increasingly used as a preventive health measure for its ability to bolster resistance to disease, and is effective for a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction, some of which include:

  • Migraine Headaches
  • Chronic Neck and Back Pain
  • Motor-Coordination Impairments
  • Colic
  • Autism
  • Central Nervous System Disorders
  • Infantile Disorders
  • Learning Disabilities

Janet also learned about Integrated Manual Therapy techniques that impact not only the cs craniosacral system but also impact the fascial system, organs, lymph system, and nervous system. She enjoys learning this field and continues to work with a mentor to continually improve her abilities. In addition, working with various colleagues that are trained in IMT has introduced her to additional alternative approaches which makes it very rewarding for her.

Janet’s Integrated Manual Therapy (IMT) program is based from this study and incorporated into a traditional occupational therapy approach (and sometimes aquatic therapy settings). The therapy helps a body achieve balance to help a body work as optimally as possible. A person’s anatomical, physiological and emotional systems can all take a toll on a body’s balance. Through this very light pressure at specific points of the body she investigates and eases the primary cause of the current pain or dysfunction. Her work may help a person have improved mobility and movement, circulation, sensory function and immune responsiveness.

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This treatment is very individualized and Janet feels that many people can benefit from the treatment, even those without a disability. Janet will often get “tune ups” so that her body is able to work with less compensations and work as optimally as possible with less effort. The treatments may benefit many people to live with less pain, greater mobility, greater energy and better sleep.

For more information about Occupational Therapy services such as IMT at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit our website.