All posts by eastersealsdfvr

About eastersealsdfvr

Our vision is that all children receive the developmental services they need to live their best life. Our mission is to enable infants, children, and adults with disabilities to achieve their maximum independence, and to provide support for the families who love and care for them.

Audiology Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome

By: Karyn Voels Malesevic, AuD, CCC-A, Manager of Audiology and Family Services

Children who have Down Syndrome can often have hearing loss, so a therapy center that also has an Audiology Department onsite can make coordinating care easier. Their hearing loss may range from permanent and needing hearing aids to having frequent middle ear infections and require consistent hearing tests.

According to the research article Understanding Hearing and Hearing Loss in Children with Down Syndrome, “Children with Down Syndrome are at a greater risk for permanent and transient hearing loss as compared with their typically developing peers. Long-term consequences of late or failed diagnosis, particularly in this population, can significantly affect quality of life, including school performance, speech and language, behavioral challenges, community engagement, and safety. Therefore, ongoing audiologic monitoring and otologic management is highly recommended for this group into adulthood.”
hearing2

Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley has Audiologists in our Elgin and Villa Park centers who are experts at working with children that may have been considered “difficult to test” by other clinics.

We are able to fit hearing aids and make repairs and earmolds on children and adults through state programs such as Early lntervention, Medicaid, DSCC, ORS, and via private insurance or private pay options with very competitive pricing.

At Easterseals we work with the local educational Audiologists, who serve children with hearing loss that are in school. That work allows for cohesive coordination between school testing and any hearing aid or other specialized services that may be needed at an outside clinic.

We are also proud that we can continue to see the children in our care as they grow up into adulthood via our audiology clinics.

For more information on our hearing services, visit eastersealsdfvr.org/hearing.

 

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Routines and Why They Can Help

By: Laura Van Zandt, MS, OTR/L

Routines are very important for all children, but they can be particularly important for children with developmental delays. Routines help provide a sense of certainty and security for children by offering them a predictable pattern that allows them to know what to expect, which will result in less frustration as well as fewer tantrums or meltdowns.

Certain routines are almost universal, such as morning and bedtime routines, but others may exist for specific circumstances or stages of life, such as your family’s weekend morning or school or summer routine.

A great place to start a routine is having a set bedtime. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children ages 3-5 should get 10-13 hours of sleep a day (including naps) and children ages 6-12 should get 9-12 hours of sleep each night. The benefits of getting enough sleep are numerous and include mental/physical health, attention, memory, learning, behavior, and more. The AAP also recommends no screen time 30 minutes prior to bed, no electronics in children’s bedrooms, and having a set bedtime routine.

Setting up a bedtime routine:

Ryan - web
Photo from Take Three Photography

Bedtime routines can be anything you want them to be, as long as they are familiar and predictable. For my infant son, he takes a bath every other day. After his bath (or mom and dad quiet playtime on non-bath days), he gets a nice massage and we read a couple goodnight books. When he shows us signs of being tired, we turn off the bedside lamp, swaddle, and turn on the white noise machine.

This routine is something I hope to keep as he gets older. For an older child, you can do a similar routine but you will need to add in time for personal hygiene and perhaps next day activities such as pick out your clothes, pack your backpack, etc. You can use a similar routine for naps, except they would just be shorter.

Aside from bedtime, morning routines, can also be beneficial. Some families have different weekday and weekend morning routines, but other children may need to have one routine that stays the same regardless of the day.

Mealtime can also present an important routine. An easy place to start is to try to have meals around the same time each day. I know this isn’t always possible- but getting as close to a specific time each day can be beneficial and having everyone sit together to eat.

Additionally, having chores to do in family routines helps children develop a sense of responsibility and some basic skills, like the ability to manage time. These are skills children can use for later in life that you can begin at a young age. One great example is singing the “clean up” song when it’s time to finish an activity and move onto something different.

“Clean up clean up
everybody everywhere.
Clean up clean up
everybody do your share.

Clean up clean up
everybody everywhere.
Clean up clean up
everybody do your share.”

Routines can also be great for teaching personal hygiene. Ever heard a parent sing the ABC song while their child washes their hands? This is just one great example.

Here are some tips if you are looking to introduce routines into your daily life:

  1. Only change one part of the day at a time.

2. Come up with your basic non-negotiables and then give your children some                    choices (bedtime stories together or separate?).

3. Make a poster with the routine, including photos in the right order, to allow for              self-monitoring. In a good routine, everyone understands their roles, knows what              they need to do and sees their roles as reasonable and fair.blog_visual

4. Follow the same routine every single day for at least one month, after which it will         become habit and your older kids should be able to keep themselves on schedule for         the easy routines.

Establishing routines has lots of great benefits that can help both you and your child develop scheduling abilities, and increase the likelihood that your family will have a smooth day.

For more information on Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit eastersealsdfvr.org. 

Pretend Play Activities

By: Laura Bueche MOT OTR/L

26_Jack and Kathleen

Pretend play is an important piece of development. It promotes social skills, cognitive flexibility, imagination, language, and helps kids process the world around them. When your child participates in pretend play, they are learning the social and emotional roles of life in a fun, hands-on manner. It can stimulate creativity and help them grow to be more comfortable with themselves and the role they play in their everyday lives.

Included below is a list of potential pretend play scenarios to get your creative parent ideas flowing:

Doctor: This is a great pretend game to teach your kids about responsibility, while encouraging them to be proud of “taking care” of someone else!

Kitchen/restaurant/coffee shop/ ice cream shop: This is a great way to help your children learn about food and nutrition, and get them interested in what goes in their bodies and how it fuels their energy.

Grocery store: Another fun way to help them learn about nutrition, while also helping them improve math skills by counting and setting prices for different items being “sold”.

Animal shop/vet: A fun hands-on approach to learn about animals and the important role they play in many peoples lives

Airport: This is a great way to help children understand the different means of transportation and travel people utilize, especially if they have never gone anywhere far from home

Beach vacation: Similar to playing airport, this can help kids understand about travel and the vast and different climates many people live in, especially if your family does not live near a beach.

Brownie Miliana2.jpg

Baby bath time/ feeding baby/ baby diaper/ baby bed time:

Similar to playing Doctor, this is a great way for kids to foster an interest in responsibility and taking care of others, while also boosting their confidence in discovering their helpful abilities!

Camping adventure: This is a way to improve kids outdoor skills, while teaching them about nature and the environment they live in.

Pirate treasure map adventure: This is a fun way to get kids creativity flowing and help them learn about adventures they can take and create in their mind

Haunted house: This can be as scary or safe as your child is comfortable with, and can allow them to explore and set boundaries in their mind for what makes him/her comfortable

Dress up/fashion show:

dress up

This is a fun way to let kids try on a new role for size, and to help give them the experience of “walking in other peoples shoes”

Police man/woman: Similar to playing dress up, this gives kids the impression of what kind of jobs people in their community hold

Gardening/ making mud soup/ building sand castles: A very hands-on way to explore nature and learn about the plants and trees they see everyday

Making toy/Lego cities: This allows kids to be totally free-spirited in constructing what they think a fun space to live/play in would be.LEGO Run Pre-Party 029.JPG

Making puppets/puppet theater: This is a healthy and fun way for kids to express their emotions and feelings, while also allowing them to explore new emotions they may not be familiarized with yet.

Firefighter: Identical to playing police officer, this allows children to try out the role of what a firefighter does for their community.

Pretty mixed race girl and Caucasian boy pretending to be superh

Super hero/ defeat bad guys and save good guys:

This helps kids understand right from wrong and the values you as a family have, while also helping them feel good about the choices they make.

Tea party: This is a fun way for kids to make up their own rules and find out what it means to be “in charge” of a dining situation

Post office: Kids can learn about roles in their community and better understand a job they see people enact daily.

Car washplaying carwash.jpgPerfect for a summer day, playing car wash can show your kids real life chores in a positive way, while also making for a fun water activity.

Fishing boat: This is a great way to get your kids to explore nature in their minds, as well as understand a fun hobby many people enjoy.

Santa’s work shop: If you and your family celebrate Christmas, this is a wonderful way to introduce the holiday to your children and help them understand the tradition of Santa Clause and what that means to your family.

Farmer: Similar to playing police officer or firefighter, this can help children understand a job people either in or out of their community hold, while also helping them develop a healthy relationship with food and animals.

 

Doll house: This is a great way to get your children interested in how a household runs and the work it takes to sustain a healthy lifestyle, as well as be a fun outlet for them to get creative and cultivate different personalities and traits for each doll.

23a_Brady_and_Cooper_CoulterRace track/ train tracks:

Similar to playing airport, this helps demonstrate to children the different means of transportation available to them, as well as foster a desire to explore and travel

Many of these pretend activities/games include props, but always feel free to encourage your children to use their imagination and create props in their mind or with another item in your house, especially if the props are not readily available to you.

From one mom to another: Early Intervention tips

By: Laura Van Zandt, MS, OTR/L

Having a newborn baby can be just as equally thrilling as it can be equally exhausting. Adjusting back to home life can be overwhelming at times as you are healing and beginning to learn all about your new bundle of joy. Understanding that all newborn babies are very different from each other, here are five tips that I found helpful as both a new mom and pediatric occupational therapist:

  1. First and foremost remember to breathe and smile. This time of your life is both wonderful and stressful. Deep breathing has been proven to be very beneficial. The many benefits include a reduction in stress and blood pressure. Deep breathing releases natural “free-good” hormones in our body. Learning a few techniques and tuning into your body for just a few moments can help. If you can force a smile on your face. A smile can be enough sometimes to turn any situation into something to find humor within.

    will2
    Try calming breaths while giving your infant a massage.
  2. Use your tribe and forget as much as possible about modesty. Your tribe, or your support team, doesn’t care what you look like or that you haven’t showered in several days. They love you for who you are and not anything else. Those first weeks can be challenging, especially if you have a children with medical needs. Let them help so you can a little rest to keep yourself going strong.
  3. Talk to yourself. It might feel funny at first but it can help. It doesn’t matter what you say. I often find myself talking about anything and everything- the plan for the day, what is happening right now, about my son’s family, etc. The added benefit of talking to yourself is your child also gets to hear your voice.
  4. Try to develop routines early. It’s really hard the first weeks adjusting and even thinking about routines. I’m not even sure most newborns have routines aside from eat, sleep, and diaper changes; however, if you can try to establish some routines it will help your sanity and also help your newborn develop. For my little one, we try to follow a little routine of eat, quiet alert/play if he stays awake, and sleep. I try to use similar songs and even sing the same song over and over when he is trying to sleep. You can even plan to take a stroller walk around the block the same time every day. Having routines help signal to our bodies a sense of calmness and can provide a little bit of organization when things are crazy.
  5. baby sleeping on white cotton
    Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

    Sensory strategies can be your best friend. Some ideas include the use of auditory input such as white noise, talking softly, or singing, movement and swings, and deep pressure or swaddling. It was crazy what a little bit of white noise did for my son. It was enough to calm and quiet him. Now I use it at bedtime to help him get back into a deeper sleep. I use one with a timer so it doesn’t run continuously. I also talk a lot to my son. It was amazing how fast he learned to recognize my voice and respond to a calm voice, if he wasn’t too upset. I was never someone who spoke aloud but now I found myself telling him all kinds of things. I think the soft melody of my voice must have some calming property for him. Also deep pressure and movement can help a newborn in those early months. When a newborn enters this world they are in a position called physiological flexion which they slowly work out of over the next month or two. Swaddling provides physical boundaries much like the womb which allows your child to feel secure. When they wiggle within the swaddle believe it or not they are learning very early about where their body is in relation to this great big world they entered. Along with swaddling you can also try massage. Infant massage has shown to be a wonderful bonding time for newborns are their parents. Movement is the next sensory strategy. I was very lucky my son loved his swing from the very beginning. I don’t know if this had anything to do with how much I moved around on my job, but back and forth movement is one of the best ways to help calm a child. Rocking chairs and swings can be your best friend.

If you find this newborn phase to be very difficult or think you child may not be reaching his/her milestones, talk with your pediatrician and schedule an evaluation. Many parents find physical, speech, occupational or nutritional therapy for short or long periods provide much needed support and growth for their infants. Learn more at eastersealsdfvr.org. 

 

 

Understanding the Grieving Process for Parents of Special Needs Children

By: Sharon Pike & Cara Long, Parent Liaisons

It’s graduation season! We love seeing and hearing about the accomplishments of each graduate and their hard work! But for some parents, seeing their child’s peers reach graduation or other milestones, can trigger many emotions, especially if their child has a developmental delay or disability. For some children, these milestones will come much later or maybe not at all.  We hope to give you a greater understanding of the process families experience in coming to terms with a child with a developmental delay or disability. We speak from experience as we each have a beautiful young woman with a disability.

Sharon & Alison 2.jpgFirst, after the birth of a child with special needs, the diagnosis or incident that changes their child, parents will grieve the loss of the “perfect baby”, they’ve dreamed about. They grieve the dream, not the child.

Dr. Ken Moses is a psychologist who has devoted himself to helping people deal with crisis, trauma and loss. He describes it beautifully and accurately, “Parents generate core level dreams for their children even before the child is born.  Disability shatters those dreams. Grieving is the process where by parents separate from those shattered dreams and begin creating new dreams.”

He also says “few would argue that facing the devastating and continuing loss of having a child with a disability is among the most painful experiences that a person can confront. To separate from a lost dream, one must experience and share denial, anxiety, fear, guilt, depression and anger in whatever order or manner the feelings surface.” You can read more in The Impact of Childhood Disability: The Parent’s Struggle.

20110926 EasterSealsFashions (65 of 98)
Photo from Rich Howe

We recognize that for many parents this is their first experience with a disability and it unfortunately takes time to gain the insight needed. We want to help you work through the states of grief Dr. Moses mentions, so you aren’t stuck in a certain stage and can see the great potential in your child. This potential might be different than you imagined, but is still a wonderful journey.

We agree with Dr. Moses that the process takes time and honestly never really ends.  We learn to reshape our dreams with the help of the professionals we surround ourselves with. But grieving is the only way we can move on.  The parents who resist this process, become worse not better in response to the loss of the dream.

Below are Dr. Moses states of grief that you may be familiar with but need to recognize and move through them on this journey:

shockDenial/Shock

  • This stage gives parents the chance to “feel it” and start to find support and ways to navigate this new world they’ve been dropped into.
  • It buys time needed to blunt the initial impact, to discover inner strengths, find resources.

Anxiety

  • With the loss of a dream, parents are forced to change
  • Anxiety mobilizes the energy needed to make these changes

Fear

  • This stage speak to itself! The questions come “Will he walk, Will she talk,” “Will he go to college or marry?”

Depression

  • This stage is one that parents can feel repeatedly over the years and it’s depths can be simple sadness to deep, long lasting depression that needs medical intervention.

anger

Pain/Guilt

  • This stage also gives parents the chance to “feel it” to “question it” and ask themselves “What did I do to cause it?” “Why did my body fail?”

Anger

  • This stage parent ask,”Why me, why not you?”
  • A parent’s sense of justice is challenged
  • Their anger is often directed at someone or something (child, medical professional, or spouse)

Acknowledgement and Hope

  • Parents have come to grips with the fact, this is life and with modifications they can still live the dreams they had for their child and family.
  • They learn that there is always Hope.

This journey is reflected in this poem from a parent of a child with autism.

What You Should Know About My Child
by Brian Rubin 

Remember that he is, first of all, my child.
Let me see him smiling in his sleep.
And let me think how handsome he is.
Help me not lose sight of my son
In the sight of his limitations.

I know that you care for my child,
And that you work hard with him.
I need your expertise to help him become All that he is capable of being.
You need my help in understanding who he really is.
And in the following through at home
With things that are important.

Remember though, that you send him home at night,
And have weekends off and paid vacations.
Let me have the luxury of having a vacation…
Sometimes physically, sometimes emotionally.
For  a day… a week… a month..
Without your judging me.
I will be there for him when you are long gone.

I love my child with an intensity that
You can only imagine.
If on a given day, I am tired or cross with him,
Listen to me.
Lighten my burden.
Do not judge me.

Celebrate with me.
Rejoice in who he is and who he will become.
But forgive me if, from time to time,
I shed a tear…
For who he might have been.

renee

This journey is hard and can be isolating, especially for parents of babies with challenges.  But you are not alone. We are here to support families through this process. We can be your sounding board and help find whatever resources you need. To learn more about our family services, click here.

5 Tips for Keeping Hearing Aids on Babies/Toddlers

By: Beth Rosales, Au.D, CCC-A.

hearing1

As both an audiologist and a mother of 2 young children who wear hearing aids, I definitely understand that keeping hearing aids on your child can be a very difficult task. Young children and babies seem to love to get their hands on those hearing aids and pull them right out of their ears! I often hear from parents of babies and toddlers that they have tried to keep the hearing aids on their child, but it seems impossible. As a result the child doesn’t wear the hearing aids regularly, which means he or she is not hearing very well most of the time, and this will likely delay oral speech and language development.

When 2 of my boys ended up needing hearing aids, I knew I had to do everything I could to keep their hearing aids on their ears when they were awake. Well, I can say from personal experience that the struggle is very real when it comes to keeping hearing aids on young babies and children, but utilizing some helpful tools and tips can make it a lot easier.

Tip #1 – Pilot hats

Baby nico on swingThis is best for babies up to 18 months old or so. I fell in love with pilot hats and here’s why you should too. Not only are they cute, but they will make your life so much easier!! For my boys, pilot hats worked better than anything else when they were very young. The pilot hats should be lightweight and ideally have mesh sides or very thin material that will not block the sound from entering the microphones of the hearing aids. It’s important to get a pilot hat that fits well. If it is too loose, then it will be too easy for your little one to get his hands under the hat.

Here are some great places to get pilot hats that work well with hearing aids:

  • LilNells: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LilNells  My personal favorite shop! The hats fit my sons very well, and she makes them with snap closures, as well as ties. I love the snap closure because they are harder for toddlers to undo (tie up closures can work too, but tie closures are easier for kids to play with and untie). The shop owner also has options with mesh sides available and unlined (thin) hats, both of which are good for hearing aids. She is great at making custom orders, so if you see a hat you like that doesn’t have mesh sides, send her a message to see if she can make it with mesh sides, or if you have an idea or color you’d like, just send her a message to see if it is possible. Hats cost about $15 – $18.
  • Anchor Your Hearing shop: etsy.com/shop/AnchorYourHearing. These hats come with mesh sides which are very breathable so there won’t be too much material covering the microphones of the hearing aids. You can email the owner of the shop through etsy with any questions about orders, sizes, etc. Hats cost about $15-$18.
  • Emmifaye shop: etsy.com/shop/emmifaye. Another etsy shop that sells pilot hats for hearing aids with mesh sides. Cost per hat is about $12.
  • Hanna Anderson hannaandersson.com. These hats are also an option ($14 for the Pilot Cap – not the “winter” pilot caps which are lined, but rather the regular pilot caps which are thinner, not lined, and less expensive than the winter hats).
  • Silkawear silkawear.com. Cost is about $28 per hat.

Tip #2 – Crochet type of Headbands

baby headbandIf pilot hats don’t work, but your child tolerates wearing headbands well, then consider trying crochet type of headbands (worn over the ear, somewhat like the mesh pilot hats). Some patients have found that tight fitting, crochet type of headbands are useful to hold the hearing aids on and these can sometimes be found at stores like Target or Walmart. They can also be found online at stores or on etsy.com.

Tip #3 – Toupee Tape

toupee tape.jpgHooray for toupee tape! Some children benefit from using toupee tape on the behind-the-ear part of the hearing aid. I use this on my 4-year-old son’s hearing aids when he has gymnastics class! It helps stop his hearing aids from flopping off his ears. This is basically like 2-sided tape that you can use on skin. You can cut the tape into a small square or rectangle to fit onto the hearing aid. Place the tape on the behind-the-ear hearing aid, and then tape it to the child’s head since it is meant for skin contact. Some people have found this helpful to use along with the hats or headbands. My 4-year-old no longer needs a pilot hat, so this is a nice solution for when he is doing sports activities. You likely need to replace the toupee tape daily or whenever you take the hearing aids off your child and then put them back on him. Toupee tape can be purchased at places like Sally’s Beauty Supply (local stores carry this). www.sallybeauty.com.

Tip #4 – Otoclips

octoclips.jpg

I love otoclips! Otoclips are helpful in preventing the loss of hearing aids when a child pulls them off. An otoclip is attached to the hearing aid and it has a cord and clip that is attached the child’s clothing so that if the child pulls the hearing aid off, it will be hanging from the cord attached to the clothing.

Here are some websites that sell otoclips:

  • Westone: www.westone.com. Search for “otoclip” and if your child wears one hearing aid, he will need “monaural” and if your child has 2 hearing aids, he will need “binaural”.
  • ADCO Hearing: http://www.adcohearing.com/. Website offers a very large variety of tools for hearing aids and hearing loss, including otoclips (under “hearing aid supplies”, “clips and loss protection”).
  • The Bebop Shop (etsy.com): https://www.etsy.com/shop/thebebopshop. Very cute otoclip options, as well as some matching hair clips.

For additional tips and resources, visit Hearinglikeme.com. 

Tip #5 – Positive attitude

Have a positive attitude about your child’s hearing aids! Young children pick up on how their parents feel about things. Remember, hearing aids are a very good thing. Hearing aids will help your child hear speech and other sounds that they otherwise would not detect. This will help your child develop oral speech and language skills. So if oral communication is what you want for your child, then hearing aids will help them move toward reaching this goal. Hearing aids are wonderful things!

For more information on hearing services for children or adults, visit eastersealsdfvr.org/hearing.

Improve Children’s Handwriting

By: Laura Van Zandt, MS, OTR/L

There are many reasons children are referred to occupational therapy, but one of the most common, especially for school-age children, is because of difficulties with handwriting. Expectations for handwriting increase quickly between grades.

In most preschools, handwriting is done through more hands-on activities (think playing with play dough or using a paint brush). Then in kindergarten, children are expected to be able to write. By first and second grade, they are expected to write for longer periods of time with accuracy.

Many of the children we see as Occupational Therapists are able to write, but might have concerns with proximal stability (think core and shoulder strength), endurance, or have an inefficient grip on their writing instruments that may lead to messy handwriting. Other reasons might also be related to vision or sensory processing.

NicholasBelow are a few tools for children to help their hands for strength, endurance, and grasp.

Some things to keep in mind when picking out writing tools for children:

  • The smaller the writing instrument is, the more likely it is to encourage a tripod-like grasp (you may need to build up the handle to encourage)
  • For kids with decreased grasp strength, drawing and coloring with markers or gel crayons may be easier and decrease frustration when presented with more challenging activities
  • Work on a vertical surface whenever possible. It’s not only great for working on increasing upper extremity and core strength, it encourages wrist extension which is important for proper grasp on writing instruments

Squiggle pen

squiggle

Who doesn’t remember this pen from their childhood!? The Squiggle Wiggle Writer is a vibrating pen that produces squiggly lines. It comes with 3 interchangeable pens which slide in and out of the tip of the pen (which is great for working on bilateral coordination). The vibration is great for providing children with sensory input while drawing or writing which helps with focus and attention.

Mechanical pencils

mechanical.jpg
Picture by: www.raymondgeddes.com

I am a huge fan of using mechanical pencils with children because it helps them work on grading the pressure they use when writing. If you press too hard, the tip will break which gets frustrating after a few tries.

 

Twist and Write Pencil

twist pens.jpg

This pencil was designed for a child’s hand. The Y design not only encourages a child to utilize a tripod grasp, but it also forces them to use less pressure allowing them to write for longer periods of time without tiring.

 

Small Pencils, Broken Crayons

color-pencil-drawing-coloring-colored-pencils-159825.jpeg

 

I always have a collection of 1/2 pencils to use with the kids. The shorter a pencil, the more likely they are to use a proper grasp.

 

Beginning Writers

palm eggs

Crayola has launched a handful of new products meant just for little hands. These egg-shaped crayons are the perfect size and shape for your little artist. There are many benefits of children drawing at an early age including developing fine motor and grasping skills, encourages creativity and imagination, improves hand-eye coordination and bilateral coordination.

If you have an easel, I highly recommend having even the youngest of artists to use that because working on a vertical surface is great for kids of all ages. Working on a vertical surface helps increase core and upper extremity strength while encouraging proper wrist position, head and neck position, promotes bilateral coordination, and crossing midline skills.

clover.png

Stylus

 

pexels-photo-416396.jpegFor a variety of reasons, kids spend more time on tablets these days. As with all things, as long as you don’t overdo it, working on the iPad can provide a lot of benefits. One of the things I recommend to all parents is that if they are going to let their kids use an iPad or other kind of tablet, be sure to have them use a stylus as much as possible to help develop fine motor and grasping skills. I think this is especially important if your child is doing any kind of handwriting or drawing apps. There are a lot of different stylus’ to choose.

 

Sidewalk Chalk or Small Chalk Pieces

chalk.jpg

One of my favorite outdoor activity is drawing with chalk.

 

Learning Without Tears Flip Crayons

flip crayons
Photo by: therapro.com

This is one great product. The crayons are already nice and small to encourage a tripod grasp and having a different color on each end encourages in-hand manipulation skills.

 

Triangle Shapes

triangular crayons.jpg

Triangle shapes are perfect to encourage the use of just your first three fingers.

Forbidden Tools

window crayons  bathtub crayons

Who doesn’t like the power of doing something forbidden like writing on windows or in the bathtub! These special items from crayola are designed to encourage writing and creativity is a fun way but also keep mom and dad’s sanity with easier clean up!

For more information on occupational therapy services at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

Techniques of Occupational Therapy: Integrated Manual Therapy

Editor’s Note: Janet Mroz serves on the Occupational Therapy team at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley. She has been an occupational therapist for over 30 years and below are excerpts from a couple interviews about her work.

Janet Mroz.jpgWithin the field of Occupational Therapy there are a variety of techniques offered. The sciences are constantly evolving, which makes the profession fascinating and fun, especially for those who enjoy learning about one of the most complicated objects, the brain.

Circumstances in a person’s life can lead them to different areas of the journey. Janet was introduced to alternative medicine because of a significant car accident she faced.  Due to the injuries sustained and because traditional medicine did not resolve her medical issues, she was lead down the path of alternative medicine. At the Upledger Institute she learned about Cranial Sacral Therapy (CST) and studied the program for multiple years.

Upledger Institute says “CST is a gentle, hands-on method of evaluating and enhancing the functioning of a physiological body system called the craniosacral system – comprised of the membranes and cerebrospinal fluid that surround and protect the brain and spinal cord.

Using a soft touch generally no greater than 5 grams, or about the weight of a nickel, practitioners release restrictions in the craniosacral system to improve the functioning of the central nervous system.

By complementing the body’s natural healing processes, CST is increasingly used as a preventive health measure for its ability to bolster resistance to disease, and is effective for a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction, some of which include:

  • Migraine Headaches
  • Chronic Neck and Back Pain
  • Motor-Coordination Impairments
  • Colic
  • Autism
  • Central Nervous System Disorders
  • Infantile Disorders
  • Learning Disabilities

Janet also learned about Integrated Manual Therapy techniques that impact not only the cs craniosacral system but also impact the fascial system, organs, lymph system, and nervous system. She enjoys learning this field and continues to work with a mentor to continually improve her abilities. In addition, working with various colleagues that are trained in IMT has introduced her to additional alternative approaches which makes it very rewarding for her.

Janet’s Integrated Manual Therapy (IMT) program is based from this study and incorporated into a traditional occupational therapy approach (and sometimes aquatic therapy settings). The therapy helps a body achieve balance to help a body work as optimally as possible. A person’s anatomical, physiological and emotional systems can all take a toll on a body’s balance. Through this very light pressure at specific points of the body she investigates and eases the primary cause of the current pain or dysfunction. Her work may help a person have improved mobility and movement, circulation, sensory function and immune responsiveness.

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This treatment is very individualized and Janet feels that many people can benefit from the treatment, even those without a disability. Janet will often get “tune ups” so that her body is able to work with less compensations and work as optimally as possible with less effort. The treatments may benefit many people to live with less pain, greater mobility, greater energy and better sleep.

For more information about Occupational Therapy services such as IMT at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit our website.

Communication Breakdown

By: Courtney Leonard, MS, CCC-SLP/L

Editor’s Note: Please welcome, Speech-Language Pathologist, Courtney, to the blog. She is a big fan of music and has sprinkled references to a number of songs below. See if you can spot them all!

The road to verbal communication is a long and winding road. This road is often met with many roadblocks (i.e., mismatches in communication) or “communication breakdowns” as well as many repairs which can then “lead you to the door” of effective and efficient verbal communication. Each breakdown affords us another opportunity to broaden and engage in a wider variety of communication opportunities.

Communication is happening all around you every minute of the day. From a baby cooing in response to a loved one’s verbalizations, a toddler pointing and grunting to his favorite snack, a teenager expressing frustration with the boys her age, to adults imparting wisdom on the next generation- communication is something we do day in and day out. We communicate for a wide variety of purposes including expressing wants, needs, thoughts and emotions. We communicate to build relationships, repair relationships, and grow relationships. We communicate to advocate for ourselves, to forgive, and to make promises. Communication often, becomes such a natural part of our day that we often forget just how complex communication is.

Communication comes in a variety of forms both verbal and non-verbal. The term “communication” often brings pictures of spoken words and conversation to mind; however, communication is so much more.

baby with block .jpgBefore we reach our destination of verbal communication, we have to learn how to be effective non-verbal communicators. We begin growing our non-verbal skills as infants and young babies by learning to regulate our bodies with loved ones, learning to attend to faces, maintain attention to faces, and responding to faces to which we are attending (e.g., smiling when smiled at, frowning when frowned at, cooing when talked to, etc.). As we continue our road to verbal communication, we learn to initiate engagement with our caregivers using our voices and smiles and learn to continue engagement with our caregivers by continually responding or initiating to maintain attention. As these circles become more frequent, natural, and smooth, purposeful non-verbal communication begins starting with gaze shifting (i.e., moving eyes toward preferred activity/toy), and joint attention (i.e., making eye contact with caregiver, shifting gaze to preferred toy/thing to comment on, and shifting gaze back to caregiver). I like to refer to “joint attention” as the skill we acquire so we can say “Did you see that cute guy!?” to a friend without having to use words. As gaze shifting and joint attention strengthen reaching, pointing, and gesturing begin to emerge. Once these skills are strongly in place, then we begin to see first words.

The crazy thing is all of this development happens within the first year of life! These skills often develop without much thought or ado and as parents, therapists, and caregivers, we are hardwired to receive and foster these very sophisticated communication opportunities just as children are hardwired to develop them.

There are times, however, that these skills don’t appear to have developed in children. This may happen for a variety of reasons including: physical limitations, sensory difficulties, early trauma, neuro difficulties, etc. Whatever the reason for the delay in developing these early communication skills, there are a few things you can do in order to begin working on developing these skills.

  1. Find times when your child is calm and regulated before interacting. This may be while you are swinging them in your arms, during diaper changes, bath times, laying on the floor or on the couch, or any other time your child is calm. Having calm and regulated bodies provides the foundation for meaningful interactions.
  2. baby2Be silly! Use big facial expressions and lots of intonation in your voice to catch your child’s eye. You can sing songs, blow raspberries, play peek-a-boo, or just talk with your child. When you notice they are attending to you, stick with the thing you are doing. Your child may need a break from the interaction at some point (i.e., they may look away or walk away) but you can use the same intonation and facial expressions to try and woo them back into the interaction. This takes a lot of practice and attempts to find what will work. Don’t give up, keep trying new things until you find what works best for you and your child.
  3. Move slower. Many times I find that kids need a slower pace in order to engage and maintain interactions. You can still use fun, giant intonation and facial expressions but use them more slowly and more exaggerated. This will give the child a chance to keep up with you and an opportunity to maintain engagement for longer periods.

Mmttfc comany things can impact a child’s development of his non-verbal and verbal skills. At times, it may be appropriate for a child to receive an occupational therapy or physical therapy evaluation and start a treatment plan to work on their sensory systems and/or strengthening of their bodies in conjunction with working on increasing their language skills.

Take our free screening tool, the Ages & Stages Questionnaire , to help measure and keep track of your child’s growth and development.

By detecting developmental delays early, you have the power to change lives and educational outcomes for children! If delays are identified, Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley can offer the support needed to be school-ready and build a foundation for a lifetime of learning. Learn more at eastersealsdfvr.org. 

Easy Indoor Activities for Energetic Kids

By: Laura Donatello, PT, DPT

When heavy rain and snow hit, it leaves kids indoors for the day with a lot of energy to burn. While playing in the snow and rain can be fun, freezing temperatures and wet, icy conditions have us stuck inside. Instead of reaching for the remote or the Ipad, here are some fun activities you can do with your child to satisfy their energetic needs.

Push-Pull Activities

This total body strengthening activity targets shoulder stability as a child pushes an object at or below shoulder height with straight arms, core to change direction, and lower extremities to power forward.

Push/Pull Activity Ideas:

  1. child and laundry
    Image from 3.bp.blogspot.com

    Hide some of your child’s favorite toys in a large open room. Have your child push a laundry basket around the room, and fill up the cart with toys. You can place toys at various heights, encouraging your child to stand on their toes, climb a couch cushion, or squat down to retrieve a toy. Pay attention to the type of flooring in the room. When using a plastic laundry basket, carpet will generally be more challenging to push against, and hardwood/tile will be easier.

  2. Have a race to see how fast he/she can push the basket to the end of the hall to retrieve a toy, and back. Races can be against siblings or parents, or be in the form of a relay race.
  3. Tie a string to the basket to make this a pulling activity.

Obstacle Course

The possibilities are endless with obstacle courses. You can encourage your child to help create, set up, and clean up the course. Maybe incorporate your child’s favorite play scheme; he/she has to navigate the course to place a puzzle piece in the puzzle, feed their favorite doll, or animal. You can add multiple activities together, or just focus on a few. There are many gross motor skills that can be incorporated such as walking, jumping, balancing on one foot, and hopping.

Obstacle Course Ideas

  1. olympics.jpgLay out couch cushions on the floor for your child to step on, jump over, or climb through. Maybe even jump from cushion to cushion.
  2. Navigate a hopscotch course made out of tape on the floor. This can be modified into many different patterns such as a few boxes in a row, column, diagonal, or in a traditional hopscotch pattern. Your child can walk, jump, or hop from square to square.
  3. Crawl or squat under a string tied across two chairs.
  4. Walk on a bubble wrap road, walk across a taped line, or both!
  5. Crumple up old newspapers and grab a laundry basket to play newspaper basketball. For a balance challenge, have your child stand on a cushion or one leg to make a basket.

Exercise Dice

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Photo by Patti Mendoza

Create a six-sided dice out of cardboard and tape. On each side draw or print out a picture of a different activity such as clapping, jumping jacks, running in place, jumping, heel raises, and dancing. You can also create another dice with numbers on each side to determine how many times or seconds to complete an activity for.

Whatever activity you choose, be sure to have fun with it!

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley enables infants, children, and adults with disabilities to achieve their maximum independence, and to provide support for the families who love and care for them. If you have questions on your child’s development and need an evaluation, contact us at 630.282.2022.