Category Archives: hearing

5 Tips for Keeping Hearing Aids on Babies/Toddlers

By: Beth Rosales, Au.D, CCC-A.

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As both an audiologist and a mother of 2 young children who wear hearing aids, I definitely understand that keeping hearing aids on your child can be a very difficult task. Young children and babies seem to love to get their hands on those hearing aids and pull them right out of their ears! I often hear from parents of babies and toddlers that they have tried to keep the hearing aids on their child, but it seems impossible. As a result the child doesn’t wear the hearing aids regularly, which means he or she is not hearing very well most of the time, and this will likely delay oral speech and language development.

When 2 of my boys ended up needing hearing aids, I knew I had to do everything I could to keep their hearing aids on their ears when they were awake. Well, I can say from personal experience that the struggle is very real when it comes to keeping hearing aids on young babies and children, but utilizing some helpful tools and tips can make it a lot easier.

Tip #1 – Pilot hats

Baby nico on swingThis is best for babies up to 18 months old or so. I fell in love with pilot hats and here’s why you should too. Not only are they cute, but they will make your life so much easier!! For my boys, pilot hats worked better than anything else when they were very young. The pilot hats should be lightweight and ideally have mesh sides or very thin material that will not block the sound from entering the microphones of the hearing aids. It’s important to get a pilot hat that fits well. If it is too loose, then it will be too easy for your little one to get his hands under the hat.

Here are some great places to get pilot hats that work well with hearing aids:

  • LilNells: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LilNells  My personal favorite shop! The hats fit my sons very well, and she makes them with snap closures, as well as ties. I love the snap closure because they are harder for toddlers to undo (tie up closures can work too, but tie closures are easier for kids to play with and untie). The shop owner also has options with mesh sides available and unlined (thin) hats, both of which are good for hearing aids. She is great at making custom orders, so if you see a hat you like that doesn’t have mesh sides, send her a message to see if she can make it with mesh sides, or if you have an idea or color you’d like, just send her a message to see if it is possible. Hats cost about $15 – $18.
  • Anchor Your Hearing shop: etsy.com/shop/AnchorYourHearing. These hats come with mesh sides which are very breathable so there won’t be too much material covering the microphones of the hearing aids. You can email the owner of the shop through etsy with any questions about orders, sizes, etc. Hats cost about $15-$18.
  • Emmifaye shop: etsy.com/shop/emmifaye. Another etsy shop that sells pilot hats for hearing aids with mesh sides. Cost per hat is about $12.
  • Hanna Anderson hannaandersson.com. These hats are also an option ($14 for the Pilot Cap – not the “winter” pilot caps which are lined, but rather the regular pilot caps which are thinner, not lined, and less expensive than the winter hats).
  • Silkawear silkawear.com. Cost is about $28 per hat.

Tip #2 – Crochet type of Headbands

baby headbandIf pilot hats don’t work, but your child tolerates wearing headbands well, then consider trying crochet type of headbands (worn over the ear, somewhat like the mesh pilot hats). Some patients have found that tight fitting, crochet type of headbands are useful to hold the hearing aids on and these can sometimes be found at stores like Target or Walmart. They can also be found online at stores or on etsy.com.

Tip #3 – Toupee Tape

toupee tape.jpgHooray for toupee tape! Some children benefit from using toupee tape on the behind-the-ear part of the hearing aid. I use this on my 4-year-old son’s hearing aids when he has gymnastics class! It helps stop his hearing aids from flopping off his ears. This is basically like 2-sided tape that you can use on skin. You can cut the tape into a small square or rectangle to fit onto the hearing aid. Place the tape on the behind-the-ear hearing aid, and then tape it to the child’s head since it is meant for skin contact. Some people have found this helpful to use along with the hats or headbands. My 4-year-old no longer needs a pilot hat, so this is a nice solution for when he is doing sports activities. You likely need to replace the toupee tape daily or whenever you take the hearing aids off your child and then put them back on him. Toupee tape can be purchased at places like Sally’s Beauty Supply (local stores carry this). www.sallybeauty.com.

Tip #4 – Otoclips

octoclips.jpg

I love otoclips! Otoclips are helpful in preventing the loss of hearing aids when a child pulls them off. An otoclip is attached to the hearing aid and it has a cord and clip that is attached the child’s clothing so that if the child pulls the hearing aid off, it will be hanging from the cord attached to the clothing.

Here are some websites that sell otoclips:

  • Westone: www.westone.com. Search for “otoclip” and if your child wears one hearing aid, he will need “monaural” and if your child has 2 hearing aids, he will need “binaural”.
  • ADCO Hearing: http://www.adcohearing.com/. Website offers a very large variety of tools for hearing aids and hearing loss, including otoclips (under “hearing aid supplies”, “clips and loss protection”).
  • The Bebop Shop (etsy.com): https://www.etsy.com/shop/thebebopshop. Very cute otoclip options, as well as some matching hair clips.

For additional tips and resources, visit Hearinglikeme.com. 

Tip #5 – Positive attitude

Have a positive attitude about your child’s hearing aids! Young children pick up on how their parents feel about things. Remember, hearing aids are a very good thing. Hearing aids will help your child hear speech and other sounds that they otherwise would not detect. This will help your child develop oral speech and language skills. So if oral communication is what you want for your child, then hearing aids will help them move toward reaching this goal. Hearing aids are wonderful things!

For more information on hearing services for children or adults, visit eastersealsdfvr.org/hearing.

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Understanding Hearing Loss

By: Cindy Erdos, Au.D., CCC-A

Hearing loss can have serious consequences for individuals who experience it, as well as their loved ones.  We know that hearing loss has a negative impact on social, psychological, cognitive, and physical health.  Hearing is crucial to developing meaningful relationships and fully enjoying life.  People who cannot hear well are often cut off from their family, friends, and community.

seniors talkingAccording to the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) approximately 48 million American have hearing loss; 30% of adults 70 or older have hearing loss; and 16% of adult 20-60 have hearing loss.  It is estimated that 1 in 5 America teens have some degree of hearing loss.

Based on this information, you should not be surprised to find yourself in a conversation with an individual with some degree of hearing loss.   Many people believe if you have a hearing loss, getting a hearing aid will fix the problem.  But not everyone with hearing loss is a candidate for hearing aids, and not everyone with a hearing loss is ready for hearing aids.  It may be a surprise to learn that hearing aids are not the only solution for individuals with hearing loss.

As an audiologist, I hear these types of comments from patients and family members almost daily:

  • “I don’t need a hearing aid, everybody mumbles”
  •  “I hear better with my glasses”
  • “Everyone yells at me so I can’t understand”

Let’s look at each statement to try understand what might be happening.

“I Don’t Need a Hearing Aid- Everybody Mumbles”

Understanding hearing loss can help us understand this comment.  There are two main types of hearing loss, conductive hearing loss and sensorineural hearing loss.  Conductive hearing loss is often hearing loss caused by a medical problem such as fluid in the ears or even wax in the ear.  Conductive hearing loss mostly affects how loud sounds are heard.  Conductive hearing loss typically can be medically corrected.

Sensorineural hearing loss is often caused by damaged nerve cells in the inner ear most commonly due to age, noise exposure or hereditary hearing loss.  Sensorineural hearing loss typically cannot be medically corrected and is most likely permanent. For many individuals starting to develop a sensorineural hearing loss, the low frequency sounds are heard at normal or nearly normal level (or volume), but they gradually start losing higher frequency sounds.  For understanding speech, high frequency sounds, or consonants provide a lot of meaning.

Besides the Listener’s hearing loss, another key factor that contributes to the “Everybody Mumbles” comment is caused by the speaker.  Many of us speak very quickly during conversations which causes us to blur our speech.  For an individual who is missing key sounds, conversational speech often compounds the difficulty understanding and can make it nearly impossible to follow the conversation.  Here are two examples of how conversational speech is delivered and received.

“The shiplef ona twowecruise.”   (The ship left on a two week cruise)

“We’re lookin for a whitruck tabuy.” (We are looking for a white truck to buy)

One of the most important things we can do when speaking to someone with hearing loss is to slow down a little bit, speak clearly, and pause between phrases or key words. 

“I Hear Better With My Glasses”

pexels-photo-432722.jpegAlthough only 30-40% of the English language is visible on the lips, most people, whether they realize it or not, speech read to some extent.  Relying on lipreading alone can be extremely difficult, but speech reading can be a nice supplement to hearing and understanding a conversation.  And fortunately, a lot of the consonant sounds that are difficult for many hearing impaired individuals to hear can be “seen.”  For example, “death” and “deaf”.  The sounds “th” and “f” look very different on the face.  Speech reading is more than simply lip reading, or using what you see on the speaker’s lips, it involves watching facial expressions and gestures to understand conversation.

When speaking with someone with a hearing impairment, remember they may benefit tremendously by being able to watch your lips as you speak. To assist them make sure you are within 3-6 feet; face them ensuring the visible features of speech are available; do not cover your mouth with your hands other objects; and make sure there is good lighting.  Remember, “I hear better with my glasses on” because I can see your face better.

“Everyone Yells at Me so I Can’t Understand”

Having hearing loss does not mean someone can tolerate sounds louder than someone with normal hearing.  There are a few reasons louder is not always better for someone with a hearing loss.  The first is due to something called “recruitment.”  Related to the damage to the nerve cells, all individuals with sensorineural hearing loss have recruitment.  Very simply, recruitment is when we perceive sounds as getting too loud too fast.   Just as loud sounds can be uncomfortable for someone with normal hearing, loud sounds can be very uncomfortable for someone with hearing loss.

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Typically, we yell or speak loudly to someone when we are upset or frustrated.  Speaking very loudly to someone with hearing loss can give the impression that you are angry with them.  No one enjoys being yelled at and it can make the person feel embarrassed about their hearing loss.

If you find yourself in a conversation with someone with a hearing loss, remember it “Takes Two to Tango.”  Your part is to deliver your message in a way to maximize your communication partner’s ability to understand.   Some key points to remember:

  1. Make sure you are within three to six feet from the listener
  2. Get the listener’s attention before speaking
  3. Make your face is visible and look at the listener
  4. Speak slowly and clearly, but do not exaggerate
  5. Louder is not always better

If you are concerned that you or a loved one may have hearing loss, contact an audiologist at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley for a complete hearing evaluation and more information on communication strategies. For more information, visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/adult-services/.