Category Archives: Physical Therapy

All About Adaptive Bikes

By: Bridget Hobbs, PT, DPT

img_7454.jpgWant to see pure joy in a child’s face?  Put him on a bike!  Children of all abilities love the freedom, weightlessness and fun that bicycles (and tricycles) provide.  Just like children, bicycles come in all varieties and can be adapted for children with special needs.

Bicycle riding provides not only the physical benefits such as leg strengthening, increased balance, coordination and endurance, but also the social benefits of riding with family and peers.  Below are just a few examples of modified cycles that are made to assist children with special needs in their bike riding goals.

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Adaptive tricycle: The three wheels on this tricycle provide a wide base for increased stability which helps children feel safe not only when riding the bike, but when getting on and off it as well.  The high back and seat belt also provide proper trunk support to help a child stay upright and midline.  There are also Velcro foot holders to prevent feet from sliding forward.

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Tandem bicycles: Tandem bicycles allow for a parent to propel the bicycle with the option to turn the child’s pedals on or off, which enables a child to rest and enjoy the ride when they are tired. The tandem bicycle also allows for communication while simultaneously enjoying the benefits of exercise.

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Bicycle Trailer: A bicycle trailer is a good option for longer family bike rides where everyone in the family can be included.  The bicycle trailer allows for a lot of leg room and a child or adult can be easily transferred in and out of the trailer and positioned in many different ways.

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Hand and Foot Cycle: A hand and foot cycle can be used for children who have lower extremity weakness, spina bifida, cerebral palsy or low muscle tone. This type of tricycle has the ability to be propelled with either arms and/or legs.   A benefit of this type of tricycle is that children can increase their range of motion in their arms as well as work on a reciprocal motor pattern of their upper extremities.

Your child’s physical or occupational therapist is a great resource to help you and your child learn what kind of bicycle or tricycle would be good for your child.   A few companies/websites that may be helpful in adapted cycles are below:

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Thanks to a generous donor, we are pleased to launch the Jonathan Goers Bike Club at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley. This program was established to share Jonathan’s joy of biking with children who have developmental delays and/or disabilities and may not otherwise have the opportunity to ride or own a bicycle. The program will provide a child with an adapted bicycle free of charge.

Any family of a child with a developmental delay or disability is eligible to apply to this program. The bike must be returned to Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley if the child outgrows or no longer uses the bike. This will allow another child to enjoy the benefits of biking. Speak with your Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley therapist for more information on the application.

The first bike giveaway will be at our 2nd Annual Bike for the Kids event on September 17 in Elgin. Adapted bikes and trailers are welcome and all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate. Choose your distance from 100 Miles to the 2.5 Mile family ride. Learn more at www.EasterSealsDFVR.org/BikeForTheKids.

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Begin to Bike

By: Cassidy McCoy PT, DPT

Summer is a great time of year to get back on your bike.  Here are a few key concepts to help your child ditch the training wheels!

The key to learning how to balance and ride on a two-wheeled bike is to ensure proper stability at the trunk, allowing your child to move their arms and legs freely for steering and pedaling.  Here are some tips to help bring the physical components of bike riding all together.

  1. Balance bike
    1. A balance bike is a bike with no pedals. A balance bike can be purchased, or balance bikeyou can simply remove the pedals from your child’s current bike until they get the hang of it.
    2. First, start with having your child sit on the bike, lower the seat so their feet touch the ground. Have them walk the bike with their feet to begin to learn how to balance without training wheels.
    3. As this gets easier, progress to using both feet at the same time to push the bike and pick their feet up off the floor to glide while maintaining their balance.
  2. Catching themselves
    1. Another way to work on balance is to teach your kids how to catch themselves by placing their foot down when they feel like they are tipping over. Hold the bike stationary for you child as they place both feet on the pedals. Let go of the bike, allowing it to fall to one side or the other. Your child should place their foot down in order to catch their balance.
  3. Steering
    1. Using cones or other objects, set up a pattern for your child to steer around. This can be done with a balance bike while scooting/walking it through or with pedaling if your child has mastered their balance.IMG_5042
  4. Start to Pedal
    1. When your child is ready to pedal, have them start standing with their feet flat on the floor. Have them lift one foot onto the pedal that is lifted at around 2-3 o’clock. As they push down on the pedal to get the bike going, they will lift their other foot onto the other pedal and push down to maintain momentum. If needed, you can help steady the bike by gently placing your hands on your child’s shoulder or the bike seat.

 

Bonus Pro Tip:

tricycleAvoid the discomfort of hunching over to push young riders along on their tricycles. Lace a sturdy rope around the bike’s structure, careful to avoid the spokes and pedals.  This allows you to help pull the trike along, adjusting the resistance to match the child’s ability.

 

Remember to always practice safe cycling. Wear a helmet, and obey the rules of the road.

 

Help your child develop their cycling skills at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s Bike for the Kids on Sunday, September 17 in Elgin, IL.  This long-distance bike ride includes a 2.5 mile family ride, pedal parade and kid-friendly entertainment!

To learn more about Physical Therapy programs to improve strength, balance and coordination at at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit:
http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/physical-therapy.html

 

Throw Like A Pro

By: Cassidy McCoy PT, DPT

Baseball season is back, and summer is almost here, so let’s get out and get playing. Since Chicago is now home to the World Series Champions, here are some pointers to get your kids throwing like the pros.

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Initial Position

1. Face the side so your non-throwing arm is facing the target.

2. Using your elbow or fingertips, line yourself up so you are pointing directly at the middle of the target.

 

 

baseball blog 1The Throw

1. The Wind Up: Bring your throwing arm up so your elbow is bent at a 90 degree angle and is in line with your shoulder. The majority of your weight should be in your back foot.

2. Step forward with the leg opposite your throwing arm (toes pointed forwards) as you begin to bring your arm forward gradually shifting your weight into the front foot.

3. The Release: Should occur as your arm comes over your head, slightly higher then the forehead.

 

The Follow-Through (End Position)baseball blog 2

  1. The majority of your weight should be in your front foot, with the heel of your back foot, or the entire foot, lifted off the ground.
  2. Your arm should fully move diagonally across your trunk ending at the hip/leg opposite of the throwing arm, with your trunk rotated so your shoulder are facing forwards (towards the target).

Visit our website for a list of summer community based therapy programs such as Physical Therapy to work on the fundamentals of sports, emphasizing coordination, timing, physical fitness and fun! Click here for more info.

Climbing and Bouldering Therapy: The Benefits to Rock Climbing

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

This summer, physical and occupational therapists are excited to provide therapy on the walls as part of our summer outreach program “Climbing and Bouldering.” The varied terrain offers countless opportunities for physical and sensory challenges.

Rock climbing has so many benefits for kids of all ages and abilities.15_Patrick_Krueger

  • Strengthening and endurance: Climbing walls require strength and flexibility to
    successfully maneuver. Kids develop hand and finger strength as they grasp and hang onto holds of all different shapes and sizes. Some of the holds are tiny and don’t have much to grasp. Making your way up a climbing wall also requires a great deal of core strength and leg strength as your hold yourself in space. All that movement and use of your arms, legs, and core will help develop endurance for other gross motor activities.
  • Sensory processing: Kids get great proprioceptive input (sensory input to the muscles and joints) and vestibular (movement-based) experiences as they power themselves up and over while using the different holds as well as glide back down to the floor from the top of the wall! For kids who experience gravitational insecurity, rock climbing can be an extreme challenge but can be graded to meet their needs. For example, kids who are reluctant to climb high up on the wall can work on moving from side to side first. Children who also experience tactile sensitivities could also be help by all the proprioceptive input into their hands to help desensitize prior to working with different textures.
  • Motor planning and visual spatial/perceptual skills: Climbing is an awesome way to help kids develop motor planning skills. Indoor rock climbing is a great puzzle just waiting for your child to solve! The holds are all different shapes and colors. Most climbing walls also have colored tape markings that show climbers different paths they can take up the wall. This makes it easy to give a child instructions (e.g. “step your right foot on the blue hold” or “find the next hold with green tape next to it”) to challenge their abilities. Also, climbing walls usually have “routes” with
    a variety of difficulty levels, making it easy to adjust the activity depending on the skill level of the child.

    15_Brady Pembroke

  • Bilateral coordination: When kids are rock climbing, they must use both sides of their body together, usually in an alternating pattern — right hand and right foot move up to the next level, followed by the left hand and left foot. Also, kids have to learn how to differentiate between the movements on either side of their bodies. They stabilize themselves with one foot/hand while motor planning how to grasp onto and step on the next holds with their other foot and hand.
  • Confidence: Allowing kids to move outside of their comfort zone in a safe and controlled environment will undoubtedly help to build their confidence and promote development of positive self-esteem.

If you think your child might benefit from this outreach group, please visit our website for more information on Climbing and Bouldering Therapy and check out other Community Based Therapy Programs for Summer 2017!

Get Your Little One Walking

By: Bridget Hobbs PT, DPT

A child’s first year of life is so full of milestones… first smiles, first solid foods, and the first time s/he sits up on his/her own.  As the first year is coming to a close, many parents desire to see their little one taking their first steps around the time of their first birthday.  The typical window for children taking their first steps is anytime between 9 and 15 months, which is a big spectrum of time.

Below are some things that parents or caregivers can do with their child to help them get walking when they are showing signs that they are ready.

  • Set a good foundation for your baby. Walking involves strength from the entire body, not just the legs.  Believe it or not, creeping on hands and knees is an important milestone to achieve before walking.  Also, climbing over obstacles, such as couch cushions or parents’ legs is another good way to help build a solid core, or base for walking.  You can also help build strength in the core, arms and legs by teaching your child to crawl up steps. Try placing a favorite toy on the landing as motivation.
  • 01_Lucas_Vasquez2After a child learns to pull up and stand at the couch or coffee table, place toys away from their body so that the child has to rotate their body away from the support surface to reach for the toy. This technique will not only help build important rotator muscles in their trunk but will also gradually encourage them to stand with less support.
  • Once your child is standing supported holding onto furniture, have them practice little squat to stand movements. For example, motivate your child by placing a stacking ring at the height of their knees. While supporting them at their waist, encourage them to bend at their knees and hips to pick up the ring and then stand back up to help them place the ring on the stacking toy.
  • When your child is pulling up to stand, cruising side to side along furniture and starting to experiment with standing on their own, they are likely ready to start taking some steps. Hold onto one end of a hula hoop or small ring and encourage your child to hold onto the other side. While facing your child, encourage them to take a few steps while holding onto the ring for support.  You can also use a motivator, such as walking to pop bubbles or to grasp a puff snack as encouragement to get your child to talk some steps.
  • Weighing down a push toy, such as a small shopping cart or ride on toy will provide them the support they need to take forward steps. Often times these toys will move too fast, causing a child to face-plant forward if they are not weighted down, so place a gallon of milk or carton of orange juice in the shopping cart or ride on toy to help with this.

02_Josephine_Huard.jpg_waterIf your child is not showing any signs of pre-walking skills, such as pulling up to stand, walking along furniture or walking with hand held assist, and they are at the age when many of their peers are starting to walk, it’s always good to talk to your pediatrician about possible reasons why they are late to walking.

To learn more about  Physical Therapy and play-based therapy services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit our website.

 

Back to Sleep: Tummy to Play

By: Cassidy McCoy, PT

The Back to Sleep campaign rolled out in 1994 as an initiative to decrease the risk of SID, or sudden infant death syndrome. While this campaign has been successful in decreasing the incidence of SIDS, most people forget to finish the full sentence. Back to Sleep, Tummy to Play!

Placing your infant on their back during sleep times is safe practice, having your infant on their belly while they are awake (and being monitored) is very important for development.

Tummy time can promote:

  • Strong muscles in the trunk, arms and back, including strong neck muscles resulting in good head control
  • Development of appropriate spinal extension and rotation, which are both pre-requisites for walking
  • Initiation of exploring one’s environment, starting with vision and leading to reaching out for objects, rolling and eventually crawling

If a child remains on their back for a majority of their day it can lead to complications such as torticollosis, plagiocephaly or brachicephaly.  These issues can lead to developmental delay, including asymmetries with crawling and walking.

What if my child hates being placed on their tummy?

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Photo from Take Three Photography

Use some technique to make it a little easier for them!

  • You lay in a recline or semi-reclined position and place your child on your chest. Being in a reclined position eliminates some of the resistance of gravity, making it easier for your child to lift their head. This can also be used as great bonding time with your infant.
  • Have your infant lay over a boppy pillow, so the pillow is under their chest with their arms and shoulders in front. This position is similar to having them lay on your chest, decreasing the resistance of gravity.

Making tummy time fun!                  

The more time your child spends on their tummy the more they will enjoy it.

  • Get down on their level! Position yourself to be in line with your child’s eye site
  • Place different toys on the floor that are motivating for your infant to play with, such as music toys or light up toys. The toys can be placed to either side of your infant’s head or directly in front of them.
  • Babies love looking at themselves! If you have a mirror or a toy with a mirror attached, place it on the floor in a position where they can see themselves.
  • Make sure you have enough space for your baby to explore. It starts with just lifting the head and will progress to turning 180 degrees on their bellies to crawling!

For more information on Physical Therapy and play-based therapy services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit our website: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/physical-therapy.html

Pilates for Kids

By: Laura Znajda, PT, C/NDT

A study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine last month ranked United States children among the least fit in the world—the US ranked 47th out of 50 countries in physical fitness of our children!   With a sedentary lifestyle linked to heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, it is more important than ever to get our children moving and instill healthy behaviors that will last a lifetime.  It’s been shown that children whose parents exercise regularly are more likely to exercise and be active as adults.  Exercising together is fun and more motivating for both parents and their kids.

A good physical fitness program includes a variety of exercise and movement activities.  Pilates is just one of many exercise methods that is gaining popularity among adults, and with its focus on core strength, stability, and body awareness, this exercise method can be used with kids too–and with great benefits.  And since many Pilates exercises use body or limb weight for resistance strengthening,  little to no equipment is needed.  So  grab a piece of floor and perhaps an exercise ball, and have fun while being active with your kids!

Pilates Bridge is an exercise that strengthens gluteal (buttock) muscles and hamstrings, while providing a stretch to flexor muscles across the front of the hips.  It requires core muscles to work together, leading to good posture and balance for all future dancers, gymnasts and sports enthusiasts. To make it fun for kids, help them place feet (and lower legs if more support is needed) on an exercise ball and lift hips and spine off the floor.  Weight should be on the shoulders and feet.  You can stabilize the ball if needed, or have the child wedge the ball in a corner before starting.

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Swimming Exercise strengthens extensor muscles of the back, hips, thighs and calves that kids need for running and jumping.   Lying flat on the tummy, have the child lift one arm at a time, keeping the legs straight and long.  As the child gets stronger, cue him to lift one or both legs off the floor , always keeping them stretched as long as possible.

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Younger children might need help stabilizing one arm against the floor while they lift the other.  Make it fun by pretending to be an alligator chomping on his dinner or reaching for small objects.

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Pilates Leg Circles are hard for many adults, and even harder for young kids who lack abdominal strength to stabilize the trunk while moving their legs above their body.  But working on the starting position for this exercise will help kids learn to engage abdominal muscles prior to moving their legs when climbing or kicking a ball. Ask the child to lie on his back and lift his feet above his body (hips at a 90 degree angle).  Make it fun by placing small bean bag animals on his feet or ask him to squeeze the animals between his feet.pilatesblog2

Plank strengthens core muscles that are critical for a stable, balanced body, whether your child likes to exercise on the playground or by playing a competitive sport.  The key with plank is to only hold the pose for as long as you can keep good form.

Give your child the support of an exercise ball to start, bringing her forward onto her hands.  Keep the ball positioned under the hips if needed; move it to the lower legs as the child gets stronger.  She should be able to keep her tummy lifted and the back straight (not arched or sagging).  As soon as the trunk starts to lose its form, take a rest and try again after a minute or two.  Make it fun by singing a song while holding the plank position.

Proof that Pilates exercise can be used by everyone, many Pilates moves have been adapted for use in rehabilitation.  Pilates is used to rehabilitate orthopedic injuries in adults as well as to strengthen and improve body awareness for children with neuromuscular disorders.

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley therapists are expanding their knowledge of using Pilates in therapy with a continuing education course taught by Sara Koveleski Kraut, DPT,  on January 21-22, 2017.  The course is open for registration by adult and pediatric therapists at eastersealsdfvr.org/ce.

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley is also a teaching center that provides innovative continuing education courses that promote therapeutic excellence for speech and language pathologists, physical and occupational therapists, educators and other professionals.  To be added to the course email list, please email us.

 

Gross Motor Play- Why Some Kids Won’t Participate

By Laura Znajda, PT, C/NDT
Manager of Community Based Therapy and Continuing Education

Summer is the ideal time for outdoor play, and children who love to run and climb are in their element. But children with very mild developmental challenges– or even no diagnosed problem at all— can have a great deal of difficulty learning new motor skills and keeping up with their peers on the playground.  Some children are mistakenly thought to be “clumsy” or “lazy” when they don’t try the advanced motor skills other children their age are mastering.

Physical and occupational therapists sometimes receive referrals to work with these children to strengthen their bodies so that they can gain skills more easily and keep up with their peers.  However, there is more to motor skills than just strength.  Pediatric therapists must analyze a child’s performance and consider all factors that might be impacting their success:Hannah_T

Flexibility
:  We all need normal range of motion in our joints to perform daily tasks, but outdoor play can require extreme ranges of movement as kids stretch their limbs to make that great play of the game or to access new parts of a play gym.  A restriction in range of motion at the hip or shoulder might make climbing the slide ladder difficult.  A neck range limitation could make it challenging for a child to scan the playing field for a teammate that is open for a pass.

Motor Planning:  Paraphrased from Jean Ayres, PhD, motor planning is defined as the act of planning movements inside the brain to complete a series of actions in the proper sequence.  Before a child even starts to move, the sequence of action is planned out in the brain.  When the child lacks experience with a particular skill, like pumping herself on a swing or hitting a ball with a bat, she might hesitate in order to give her brain time to make a plan for this novel task.  Typically, the time it takes to get started will decrease as the task becomes more familiar, but for some children this motor planning component does not come naturally and needs assistance.

Emmett_T.jpgBalance:  Children need to be able to balance on one leg long enough to lift the other leg to a raised surface or to kick a ball.  Even more importantly, they need dynamic balance—that is, control of their bodies while they are moving and balanced on one limb in order to reach out to the side to catch a baseball or make a soccer save.  A child with balance difficulties will seek out stable objects to hold when he has to lift a foot for any length of time or will avoid these activities altogether.

Coordination:    According to CanChild, a research center at McMaster University that organizes clinical  research concerning children with developmental conditions, coordination is a sequence of muscular actions or body movements occurring in a purposeful, orderly fashion (smooth and efficient).  We often think of coordination as the ability to use both sides of the body at the same time.  We need coordination to make the same movements with both arms and legs when we do exercises like jumping jacks.  And we need coordination to do different things with each body part, but all at the same time, such as dribbling a basketball while walking or running.  A child with coordination difficulties might need these advanced motor skills to be taught in a more graded manner before she can master them.Robbie_T.jpg

Motivation:  It might seem obvious that a child must be interested and motivated in an activity in order to be successful with it, however this important component of motor skill performance is sometimes overlooked.  Although research is inconclusive as to exactly how many repetitions are needed, we do know that a new skill requires at least hundreds of repetitions in order to become proficient.   If a child is not motivated to play a particular sport, he will not have the determination to practice a skill over and over and will not see the success that comes from that critical repetition.

Finally, strength is important. Just as necessary as all of these motor skill components; but not the only factor to consider when a child is hesitant or unsuccessful with outdoor play.

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley therapists are expanding their ability to get to the bottom of why children don’t participate in outdoor play and develop new strategies to help them through a continuing education course taught by Lezlie Adler, OTR/L, C/NDT and Jane Styer-Acevedo, PT, DPT, C/NDT on September 22-23, 2016 at our Villa Park center.  Registration is open to all therapists at:  http://www.eastersealsdfvr.org/ce

References

Can Child, Institute for Applied Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 1C7  www.canchild.ca

Ayres, A. Jean, Sensory Integration and the Child, Western Psychological Services, 2005.

A New Perspective about the Playground

By: Bridget Hobbs, PT

Summer is finally here and your little ones are asking to go to the park.  So, pack a few snacks, slather on the sunscreen and take advantage of this free way to build confidence, make friends and gain gross motor skills at the same time.

Children learn best through play-based experiences and exploring the playground is great way for children to refine their gross and fine motor skills.  Here are a couple ideas for parents and caregivers to engage their children at the park in order to build not only bonding and fun, but to also build muscle strength, endurance and gross motor skills.

Here are some new or different ideas to incorporate to your little one’s playground fun:

Playground-28.jpgClimbing up the slide

As a child, you were likely told to just go down the slide.  Of course if there are children waiting to go down the slide, climbing up it is not a good idea.  However, if the park isn’t crowded, help your child bear walk (on hands and feet with bottom in the air) up the slide.  Doing this builds great core strength as well as cross-body coordination skills.

Using the dividers as balance beams

Playground-20.jpgThere are often railroad-tie type of dividers that divide the grass from the wood chips/foam surface under the playground equipment.  Challenge your child to go across these as they would a balance beam.  They can experiment with going forward, backward, side-stepping and even doing toe taps to the ground each step.  This activity helps with control of leg and core muscles as well as coordination skills that your child will use in gym class and on sports teams in the future.

Use hills to your advantage

If you participated in track or cross-country in high school, you know that training on hills was a vital component to the big picture of a race.  Make hills fun for your little one by rolling down them like a log to help with development of the vestibular system.  You can also really challenge them by bear walking or crab walking up or down the hill.

Don’t avoid the climbing wall

Playground-45.jpgChildren as young as toddlers can enjoy the climbing wall with help of their parents.  Even if you have to support their body, children learn motor planning and sequencing by deciding where to best place their hands and feet to navigate the wall.   A bonus is that the small muscles in the hand are strengthened by grasping the holds, which can lead to improved ability to write and play ball sports in the future.

There is a lot of research that clearly links play with brain development, motor and social skills.  Playgrounds provide different textures, sensory experiences and motor planning opportunities for children to help build their development.  So, think outside the box the next time you are at the park with your child and try to incorporate these different ways to assist with their development.

For more information on physical therapy and play based therapy services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit our website.

*Above images by Molly Gardner Media

 

Help Your Little One Love to Swim!

By: Bridget Hobbs, PT, DPT

Summer months are just around the corner which means neighborhood pools and splash pads are opening.  Toddlers are so curious about the water but are often a bit scared to take the plunge and go in the pool.  Here are some fun and easy ways to get your child to learn to love the water. 

1)      Treasure Hunt: When children can sit up by themselves (about 6 months old), sit by them in the kiddie pool or a blow up pool in the backyard.  Place fun things at the bottom of the pool, such as plastic fish, rings or some of their favorite bath toys.  Pools with a zero-depth entry where you can walk in on a gradual decline are excellent for making a trail of toys into the water for your little one to follow. 

2)      Peek-A-Boo!: Once your little one is in the water, putting their face in can often be a scary thing. Playing Simon Says or Peek-A-Boo can be a fun way to break the ice.  Kids love to mimic their parents, so placing your face in the water covering your face, then lifting your face out of the water making a funny face at your child can be a hit.  Practicing blowing bubbles through a partially submerged straw is also fun for kiddos. 

3)      Getting comfortable on their back:  Floating on their backs is one of the first things that kids learn in swim lessons.   While you are supporting them under their mid back, asking kids to describe shapes of the clouds, sing songs and even looking for airplanes are ways to help children ease into this skill.  Practicing back float in the bathtub is also a good way to practice this life-saving skill.

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Photo Credit: Kristi Hughes

4)      Fun with Noodles: If your pool allows noodles, having your children straddle the noodle while supporting them at their waist can be not only fun for your kiddo but also a great way to strengthen their core and leg muscles.  Have your child hold onto the noodle with two hands in front of them and pretend that they are riding a horse or biking to their favorite toy store or ice cream shop. 

5)      Listen to Your Child:
If your child cries during swim lessons or has tantrums when you are trying to get them into the pool, do not force them to go in the water as this can make it worse.  They may need a few sessions of watching other kids from the deck on the side of the pool to realize that swimming is not a scary thing.  Make sure to pick a time where your child is not tired or hungry.   Let them pick out a swimsuit at the store and fun pool toys so they feel like they have some control over this new experience. 

Swimming is one of the only sports that people can enjoy for their entire life-span.   It can also be life-saving and build confidence in your little one.  So, make sure to be positive and motivating with your little one in the water and help them learn to love to swim.

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Photo Credit: Joann Hartley

 

To learn more about Aquatic Therapy and other
Community Based Therapy Programs at
Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, click here.

Cover photo by Chris Pestel