Category Archives: Speech & Language Therapy

Speech and Language Evaluation: What to Expect

By: Jennifer Tripoli M.S.Speech Language Pathologist

You and your child may wonder what to expect when participating in a speech and language evaluation. Many children (and parents!) feel less anxious when they know ahead of time what they will be doing. Of course, the outline of a speech and language evaluation depends on the age of the child and the areas of need. Below is a general outline for a speech and language evaluation:

1. Parent Interview

Parents are the best reporters of their child’s development. They know their child and can paint a clear picture of their child before the speech pathologist begins the formal assessment. A formalized assessment does not always “pick up” everything that should be known about a child. A caregiver or parent’s role in a pediatric speech and language evaluation is crucial in helping the speech pathologist determine your child’s needs. During this interview, the therapist will usually ask you why you have come in for an evaluation, and ask about your concerns and goals for the evaluation.

2. Case History

A case history usually includes a medical history and developmental history. Typically, the speech pathologist is able to review provided information prior to the evaluation, but often there are additional questions that need to be answered.

A medical history includes any medical issues that your child has encountered since birth or before birth. Often this includes, but is not limited to pregnancy/birth history of the mother (e.g. complicated pregnancy, premature birth, complicated delivery), major surgeries, procedures or tests (e.g. tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, ear surgeries, brain surgeries, hearing screenings/tests, MRI/CT, etc.), significant illnesses, infections or injuries (e.g. chronic ear infections, chronic congestion, respiratory illnesses) and/or hospitalizations.

It is also important for the speech pathologist to be aware of any specialty physicians your child has seen such as otolaryngologists, gastroenterologists, neurologists, etc. A developmental history is taken in order for the therapist to understand your child’s developmental progression. Developmental histories include all areas of development; not just speech and language milestones. They can include when your baby first sat unassisted, crawled, walked, babbled, etc.

3. Speech and Language Concerns

During this part of the evaluation, the therapist will ask more detailed/specific questions related to your child’s speech and language skills. The types of questions will depend on your child’s age and the type of evaluation. The therapist will ask you questions related to your child’s expressive language skills, receptive language skills, social/pragmatic language skills, oral motor skills, and speech sound production.

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4. Discussion of Previous Therapies

It is important that your therapist knows what services your child has participated in previously. Has your child received early intervention services? School based services? Other private therapies? You should be prepared to explain the other therapies your child has participated in including occupational therapy, developmental therapy, physical therapy, or behavioral therapy. Please be specific in the goals of each of the therapies if applicable.development

5. Formal Assessment

01_Lucas_VasquezThe point where the therapist begins the formalized assessment can vary significantly depending on the age and deficits of your child. For a young toddler, this part of the assessment may be play based. The clinician will likely be observing your child’s current communication skills in a play setting while administering a standardized or norm referenced test. The therapist may ask to observe you playing with your child.

For a preschool or school aged child, a standardized/norm referenced test would likely be administered depending on the abilities of your child. This would yield a score that will compare your child’s skills to other children his/her age. A standardized test will likely be your child looking/naming pictures in a book and answering questions.

The clinician will also interact with your child in a less structured way by engaging in conversation or asking questions related to his/her life. The therapist may also take a language sample, which will analyze your child’s expressive language skills and speech intelligibility (ability to be understood by others). Additionally, the therapist will likely complete an oral motor assessment if appropriate in order to examine your child’s oral structures. An oral motor assessment usually asks the child to do certain movements with his/her lips, tongue, jaw and face. The therapist may also have your child eat/drink something. Though this is not a feeding evaluation, it is often difficult to separate speech and feeding skills.

6. Discussion of Results and Recommendations

Toward the end of the evaluation, the therapist will discuss your child’s results and make recommendations for any further evaluations needed. If your child would benefit from therapy, a recommended frequency would be given (e.g. weekly therapy, twice weekly, monthly, etc.) At this time, you can ask questions regarding the evaluation or your child’s prognosis.

Think your child may need a speech and language evaluation? Learn more about speech and language services provided at Easter Seals DuPage and Fox Valley here.

 

Beyond the Sippy Cup

By: Jennifer Tripoli, M.S., CCC-SLP

I often get asked the question “Should my child use a sippy cup?” It’s a difficult question to answer. Sippy cups were initially invented in the 1980s by a mechanical engineer who was sick and tired of cleaning up his son’s juice mess around the house. He uniquely devised a prototype for the no spill mechanism and just like that problem solved! He eventually sold his patent to Playtex ® and the rest is history as this became the go to type of cup for babies learning to transfer from bottle to cup.

I am sure you probably see tons and tons of children walking around the mall, playing at the park, and in the car with their sippy cups. This is the era of “to go” cups. Everyone, including adults bring their drinks (coffee, tea, water) to their next destination. I understand the convenience of sippy cups for parents and quite frankly I get it, but hopefully I can convince you to try out some other convenient cups that will support your child’s oral motor and speech development.

So why are they really SO bad?

  • Promote immature tongue movement pattern or suckle
    • Sippy cups promote an anterior-posterior tongue movement pattern, similar to the way an infant extracts liquid from a bottle or breast (suckle pattern). We want to begin to promote a more upward and backward swallow pattern for infants and toddlers by way of an open cup or straw cup. Sippy cups promote a suckle pattern especially with continued use.
  • Promote inappropriate tongue position for swallowing
    • The spout on the sippy cup can anchor the tongue tip down during swallowing. The only way for the tongue to move is forward. During a mature swallow pattern the tongue tip elevates to the area behind the upper teeth (alveolar ridge) as the tongue moves upward and backward.
  • Promote speech sound errors
    • Continued and overuse of sippy cups (and pacifiers!) promote the tongue to rest forward in the mouth. This inappropriate resting tongue position can directly impact your child’s ability to produce certain sounds. For example, a child may produce the ‘th’ sound (a frontal produced sound) in for an ‘s’ sound (‘tho’ for ‘so’). It is important to note that not all children who use sippy cups will have speech sound errors. My thought is though let’s set our children up for success by using developmentally appropriate cups!
  • Poor dental development and Dental Caries
    • Sippy cups can cause cavities and tooth decay. If your child is sipping on fruit drinks, milk, or any other sugary drinks, sugar can be left on their teeth which will cause the enamel to erode away. Sippy cups (and pacifiers!) can also cause misshaped oral cavities and affect resting tongue position.
  • Risk of Injury
    • In my research on sippy cups, I came across a study proving sippy cups can be dangerous?! Who would have thought?! A study conducted in 2012 by Dr. Sarah Keim at Nationwide’s Children Hospital in Columbus, Ohio stated every 4 hours a child in the U.S. is rushed to the hospital due to an injury from a sippy cup, bottle, or pacifier. Dr. Keim stated this likely occurs due to the child learning to walk. As they are learning to walk, they trip and fall often. If they have a bottle, pacifier, or sippy cup in their mouth they can injure themselves.

So what’s the alternative?

  • Open cups
    • Many parents think I am crazy when I suggest an open cup for a young child. Yes, it may seem a bit ambitious, but an important step in the development of good oral motor and feeding skills! When children drink from an open cup they are developing a more mature swallow pattern. A smaller open cup (with a smaller rim) will allow your child to have better motor control of the liquid. You can first try giving your child an open cup to practice without liquid (place a preferred pureed on the rim of the cup) or you can use thickened liquid in the cup for a slower flow.
  • Straw Cups
    • It may take your child some time to learn how to extract liquid from a straw, but be patient and the skill should develop! When choosing a straw cup choose a straw that is thin versus thick. Also make sure the straw is not too long. It is possible for young children to drink from a straw cup with a suckle pattern. Some children are able to extract liquid from the straw by placing the straw under their tongue. To avoid this, you can slowly cut the straw ¼ inch at a time until the straw is short enough that the child cannot place his/her tongue underneath it.

Here are a few of my favorite open cups and straw cups!

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To learn more about development milestones and speech-language therapy services, visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicative Temptation: Arranging Your Environment Can Get Your Child Talking!

By: Jennifer Tripoli, M.S., CCC-SLP

Communicative temptation is a speech therapy technique I use consistently during my sessions with children who are late to talk. It is an easy strategy that can be implemented across environments, not just in therapy! Communicative temptation was coined in 1989 by Wetherby and Prizant in order to use a creatively engineered environment to facilitate communication in young children.

In short, communicative temptations are what they sound like. You are going to tempt or entice your child to communicate by setting up your environment in a specific way. Sometimes we do not give late talkers a chance or an opportunity to learn/use communication. Not because we do not want them to talk, but more so because we anticipate their needs way too frequently.

Is your child ever struggling to open a container full of a preferred food and you jump in and open it for them? Do you ever anticipate the type of snack your child would like without allowing them to tell you? Are all of your child’s preferred toys in reach? Here are a few examples of ways you can tempt your child to communicate! 

  • Placing a highly preferred toy or food item out of reach for the child. Key is in sight but out of reach!
  • Placing highly preferred objects inside a clear plastic container that the child cannot open on their own
  • Placing a lock on a cabinet door where a preferred object is located
  • Eat a desired object in front of the child but don’t offer it to them
  • Take the batteries out of a preferred toy and wait for the child to communicate the toy is not working properly
  • Initiate a reciprocal interaction game such as “peekaboo”, then stop and wait
  • Blow bubbles with the child a few times then place the bubbles out of reach or hand the child the bubbles container without the wand
  • Push the child on the swing a few times and then stop
  • Block the entrance of the slide they want to go down
  • Change a familiar routine

Hopefully these examples, will allow you to think of other creative ways to engineer your home, daycare, toy room, etc. to allow for more communicative opportunities! The outcome is not always “talking”, it can be ANY type of communication! A gesture (e.g.

Nicholas_T
Photo by: Christine Carroll

pointing or reaching), a facial expression, a word, a phrase, etc.! The key here is WAITING. Often times, we do not give children who are learning language enough time to communicate. We jump in quickly and eliminate that opportunity to communicate independently.

Depending on your child’s language level you may need to model what is expected first (a gesture, a word, etc.). For example, if a child is attempting to open a locked cabinet you may first need to model the word “open” and then slowly fade this model. You eventually hope that the child will independently use the word after they are “tempted.”

Take a quick look at your home today. How can you make a few small changes to facilitate communication in your environment? How you can change how you interact with your child to increase communicative opportunity?

For more information about our speech services and other programs at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, click here.

My Child is Stuttering; Will He or She Grow out of it?

By: Valerie Heneghan, M.A., CCC-SLP/L

You may have noticed that your child appears to be getting stuck on words or repeating words and sounds recently, what do you do?  Your friends and/or family may have told you not to worry about it as they will likely grow out of the problem, is this true?  How can you tell if my child is stuttering?  When do I seek help for this problem?

In this post, you will be provided with a brief summary addressing questions related to childhood stuttering.

Prevalence

According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), in preschool age the prevalence of stuttering can be as great as eleven percent. The prevalence of stuttering is also greater in boys than girls up to 4:1 as the stuttering progresses.

Characteristics of Stuttering

Disfluency is anything that interrupts the forward flow of speech. Stuttering occurs when this disruption occurs within a word.

There are two forms of stuttering:

1) Sound/Syllable Repetition: repeating a single sound or syllable (e.g., g-g-g-going, bi-bi-cycle, etc.) and 2) Sound Prolongations; pausing or stretching out single sound (e.g, g__oing, ____bicycle).

Associated and/or secondary characteristics may also be present for a child who stutters.  These are described as movements as a reaction to the stuttering including but not limited to: distracting sounds, facial grimaces, head movements, movement of the extremities, etc.

Risk Factors

Stuttering is a disorder of childhood with typically emerges between the ages of two and a half and five years old. While genetics and neurophysiology appear to be related to the underlying causes of stuttering, environmental factors, temperament, and speaking demands may influence a child’s reactions to stuttering.

Recovery

80% of children will outgrow stuttering within four years.  During the first year however, 12% recover spontaneously.  Indicators that your child may continue to stutter includes but not limited to: no changes in frequency of stuttering, changes in stuttering type, duckpersistence of associated behaviors six months post onset, family history of stuttering, increased communication demands, etc.

When therapy is recommended

If you notice that your child is stuttering, mark when you first noticed the problem begin.  Initially, do not draw attention to the stuttering, decrease the communication demands and model slow and smooth speech when speaking to or near your child.

If you are concerned about your child’s stuttering, have them evaluated by a Speech-Language Pathologist who specializes in assessing and treating children who stutter.

7 Tips for Learning and Loving it!

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons M.S. CCC-SLP

Does helping your child with their homework ever feel like a laborious task?  These learning strategies will help you teach your child in a way that increases their understanding and retention.  Above all, these tips are meant to make the learning journey an enjoyable experience for all of those involved!

  1. Relate new information to known information.  Our brains are pattern-seeking devices.  They are always searching for associations between information being received and information already stored.  Linking new information with familiar information creates a connection that your brain will hold on to.blog
  1. Multi-Sensory involvement: the more varied experiences a child has with a new concept, the more neural pathways will be developed.  Whenever possible, teach the concept in a way that the child can experience.  If your child is learning about volcanoes, you can have them:

Role play being a volcano OR create a visual Venn Diagram comparing it to something they already know about.
volcan

  1. Active learning-the more a child is involved with the information, the more efficiently he will consolidate and recall it.  When a child passively receives information, he will understand and remember less.  Passively receiving informcloudation would be listening to a lecture or passing your eyes over the print from beginning to end in a chapter. Active learning would involve making predictions about the chapter, taking notes and discussing what was read or learned.
  1. Rhythm and Music: Rhythm and music stimulates both sides of the brain.  It activates our attention system and multiple neural pathways which facilitates memory and retrieval.   Create a song, set to a familiar tune that reviews key concepts in a curricular area.  Memorizing the 50 states, days of the week, or spelling words can all be easier when taught within a song or chant.
  2. Movement: Adding movement to an activity provides extra-sensory input and enhances attention.  Movement helps increase cognitive function while also helping children get rid of “the wiggles”.

It is also beneficial for children to have downtime for movement built into their days. Many studies have found that students who exercise do better in school.   Exercise triggers the release of a substance that enhances cognition by boosting the ability of neurons to communicate with each other. Below are some ideas to incorporate movement into learning:

  • Air writing letters
  • Playing charades to act out a history lesson
  • If the answer is correct, make a sign like a referee
  •  Jumping on the trampoline while doing math facts
  • Playing catch while reviewing information
  1. Humor– Humor wakes up the brain cells!  It also encourages attention and relieves stress.  Humor keeps learning an enjoyable experience for teachers, parents and children.  Using humor lets students have an increased feeling of safety in making an error or getting an answer wrong.  Make time for laugh breaks to keep your child alert and attentive while learning
  2. ReflectionDowntime is important to help the brain process new information and strengthen neural connections.  Have your child learn and study in small chunks of time.  Implement breaks for movement, listening to music, doodling or having a snack.

For more information on strategies for learning and about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit: eastersealsdfvr.org.

Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Signs and Symptoms

By: Jennifer Tripoli M.S, CCC-SLP

You may have heard the term “apraxia” before but wondered, what exactly does this mean? According to the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA),

“Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a motor speech disorder. Children with CAS have problems saying sounds, syllables, and words. This is not because of muscle weakness or paralysis. The brain has problems planning to move the body parts (e.g., lips, jaw, tongue) needed for speech. The child knows what he or she wants to say, but his/her brain has difficulty coordinating the muscle movements necessary to say those words.”

Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is not a black and white diagnosis and can be difficult for speech language pathologists to diagnose especially in very young children (under the age of 2). Children with CAS may have coexisting conditions such as Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, or some other neurological disease. Some children with CAS though do not have any other known neurological deficit.

Children with CAS may present the following key characteristics:

  • Limited vowels produced, lack of differentiation between vowels, and/or vowel distortions
  • Inconsistency or variability in productions
  • Groping of oral structures or physical struggle to produce sounds
  • More difficulty with multisyllabic words or more complex productions (longer phrases/sentences)
  • Difficulty with imitation, better productions observed with spontaneous, learned, or automatic productions
  • Choppy or monotone speech (equal stress patterns on multisyllabic words)
  • Slow rate of speech
  • Difficulty with non-speech oral movements such as sticking tongue out, pursing lips, etc. (oral apraxia)

Listed below are other common signs present in children with CAS, though are not exclusive to CAS:Baby nico on swing

  • Decreased babbling or vocal play as an infant
  • Lack of imitation skills in infancy
  • Delayed speech production or expressive language skills
  • Poor speech intelligibility (ability to be understood)
  • Decreased sound inventory for his/her age
  • Words used once and never used again

Children with CAS may not present with all of the above characteristics. There is currently no “rule” regarding how many characteristics a child must have to qualify for a CAS diagnosis.  If your child presents any of the above key characteristics, an evaluation by a speech language pathologist who specializes in CAS is recommended in order to differentially diagnosis your child.  Children with the above characteristics may present CAS or another speech sound disorder.

Visit Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley at EasterSealsDFVR.org to learn more about speech-language services and evaluation. And to learn more about CAS and access parent friendly resources, visit Apraxia Kids.

5 Reasons To Enroll Your Child in Private Therapy

By: Jennifer Tripoli, M.S., CCC-SLP

A question I am often asked is about working at a private, non-profit pediatric therapy center. What makes us different?! Well some unique qualities that compliment other services! Below are the top five reasons to enroll a child in private therapy (primarily from a speech-language perspective!).

  1. Enhancing School Services

Many children have significant issues that require more frequent, intense services in order to progress. Unfortunately, the public school districts are limited by the hours in the school day. Participating in outside therapy services allows for a child to work on similar goals or additional goals.

For some children, the repetition of school goals helps them progress faster and allows them more time to understand concepts. For other children, the school therapist may be working on one area of need where the private therapist is targeting another area of need. We are happy to collaborate with school therapists. I find that this is the best recipe for success!

  1. Your child did not qualify for Early Intervention Services (EI)

Currently, the Early Intervention Program for the state of Illinois requires a child (0-3 years of age) to have a 30% or more delay in 1 area of development in order to qualify for services, have a qualifying underling medical diagnosis (e.g. Down Syndrome), or have 3 or more risk factors for delayed development. In many cases, children do not meet the criteria as listed above for services through the Early Intervention system, but still present with developmental delays.

For example, a child may be evaluated for speech and language delay

Frank in therapy
Photo by: Nancy Kerner

through the early intervention system and only found to have a 20% delay in expressive language. In most cases, a child with a 20% delay would not receive services through EI, but may benefit from private therapy in order to improve their expressive language skills to a more age appropriate level. Just because your child has not qualified for EI does not mean they will catch up to their peers without assistance. A private speech and language evaluation may be warranted to determine if your child would benefit from speech therapy services.

  1. Your child has feeding or oral motor issues

Often, feeding and oral motor skills are not addressed in the school system as these skills may not be considered as educationally relevant as other skills. It can also be difficult to find a Speech Pathologist who has experience in working with children with oral motor and feeding deficits. Private speech therapy services can address your child’s feeding and oral motor deficits as these skills are extremely important. Here at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley our speech pathologists have an extensive knowledge of oral motor and feeding deficits in pediatrics.

  1. Your child can participate in co-treat Sessions

When appropriate, co-treat sessions may be of benefit for your child. A co-treat session is when 2 therapies are rendered simultaneously. Often children may be receiving speech therapy along with occupational therapy or occasionally physical therapy. This allows both therapists to work together in order to improve different skills.

For example, the occupational therapist can assist with improving sensory regulation so the child is better able to attend and understand speech and language concepts. The physical therapist can assist the speech pathologist with body positioning/posture to achieve the best speech/voice possible for a child with motor deficits. This is a strength at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley. We often have multiple disciplines work together to get a holistic picture of a child’s needs. Voice Box Photo

  1. Your child has minor speech/language deficits that are not addressed by the school

Some children may present mild articulation issues that may impact their ability to communicate, but are not severe enough for a child to qualify for school therapy. Private speech therapy can address these issues if found developmentally inappropriate through a private speech and language evaluation.

If you feel your child would benefit from private speech and language intervention, please visit our website here. Let me know in the comments if you have additional questions!

Raising A Reader

 

By, Jessica Drake-Simmons, M.S. CCC-SLP

Everybody knows the importance of learning letters but the lesser-known imperative pre-reading skill is phonological awareness.  Phonological awareness refers to the ability to hear and play with sounds, syllables and words of spoken language.  Children who are able to think about the sounds in words have the necessary foundation of understanding how letters and sounds operate in print.

Phonological awareness is one of the best predictors of future reading success.

Phonological awareness skills develop with exposure and direct teaching.   Here are some ideas to facilitate phonological awareness skills in your child:

Infants & Young Toddlers

  • Sing fun songs or nursery rhymes
  • Increase awareness of environmental sounds (animal sounds, sirens, trains, etc.)
  • Change pitch and volume

2-3 year olds

  • Make up rhymes that include your child’s namereading blog2
  •  Read rhyming books; give your child the opportunity to fill in the rhyme
  • Do these words sound the same game? (barn-bat, house-house, hippo-house)

4-5 year olds

  •  Encourage your child to come up with rhyming words (this is a fun game for the car!)
  • Clap out the syllables of family members names
  • Talk about the first sound in words.  Have your child think of other words that start with the same sound.
  • Take a walk around your house looking for things that start with the same sound (e.g.,door, dishwasher, dog, etc.)
  • Listen for words that start with a given sound while reading a book
  • Have your child figure out the segmented word that you say (e.g., “For lunch, we are going to have mac-a-ron-i”)
  • reading blog 1

Visit our Pinterest page for developmental norms and more phonological awareness teaching ideas.

For more information about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley please visit EasterSealsDFVR.org.

 

 

Top Five Blog Posts of 2015

Thank you for being a reader this year. Review the top five most read blog posts from this year.

5. Self Regulation: The Secret to Success: Speech-Language Pathologist Jessica Drake-Simmons shares methods to help children filter out distractions, handle emotions, delay gratification and inhibit impulses in order to be able to focus their attention on learning.

4. Myths and Realities of Augmentative Communication  As the title suggests, Speech-Language Pathologist Amanda Nagle dispels the most common concerns (myths) regarding augmentative communication.self regulation

Physical Therapist Bridget has the top posts helping parents and caregivers prevent flat head, correct sitting position and babies crawl.

3. How to Prevent Your Baby From Getting a Flat Head

2. What’s Wrong with W-Sitting? By: Bridget Hobbs, PT, DPT

1. Yes!  We Want Your Baby to Crawl! By: Bridget Hobbs, PT, DPT

Wishing you a happy new year!

For more information about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley please visit EasterSealsDFVR.org.

Indulge! Language is sweet

By: Jennifer Tripoli M.S., CCC-SLP 

With the holidays around the corner, more than likely you will be baking some sweet treats this season! Believe it not, baking can be a great context to practice language skills. Here are a few speech and language skills you can work on while making your desserts this holiday season.

  1. Following directions- auditory comprehension of 1 and 2 step directions (e.g. Get out the eggs from the fridge and put them on the counter) and reading comprehension of written directions (e.g. following written recipe).
  2. Sequencing- doing steps in the correct order is key to baking! Have your child retell you the steps to making the dessert once it is completed.
  3. Inferring/Predicting- ask your child what he/she thinks you will need to complete your recipe. “We are making chocolate cupcakes, what do you think we may need.”
    • Inferring is a child’s ability to relate known information and apply it to a new context. This is an important skill not only for language, but also academic and social success!
    • Predicting– ask your child what he/she thinks will happen prior to each step in the recipe.
  4. Describing Skills- have your child describe what he/she is seeing, thinking, feeling, smelling, and tasting! Baking provides a rich sensory environment that allows for great practice with using different adjective/attributes (e.g. “this chocolate feels sticky and gooey, looks brown, and is smooth).baking cookies
  5. Improving vocabulary- baking is a great opportunity to introduce your child to new vocabulary words that they may not learn typically be exposed to such as utensils (e.g. whisk, spatula, etc.), appliances (e.g. oven, mixer, etc.), and unique verbs (e.g. beat, stir, bake, sift, etc.). You can also have your child name other desserts they know or like to eat!
  6. Problem solving/safety- all children should be baking with parent supervision, but this provides an opportunity to teach problem solving and safety skills. For example, you can ask your child questions such as “What should I do if I burn my hand?” or “What do I need to wear when I take the cupcakes out of the oven?”
  7. Planning/organization skills-have your child take part in the entire baking process from the beginning. Have he/she make a list of ingredients, go shopping with you, and pick out what is needed.
  8. Story retelling- have your child tell people who were not present during the baking session what you made! E.g. “Tell Aunt Kelly the chocolate brownie story.”

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Now that I have shared the different language skills you can work on while baking, I better give you some yummy recipes to try these out!

I follow a blog on Facebook called “Super Healthy Kids” and they post some amazing, healthy, kid friendly recipes (including desserts!). I highly recommend giving them a “like” so you can follow along too! Also, you can check out these best holiday baking recipes from food network! Also, there are some fun and useful tips for baking with children from Food Network.

Did I really have to convince you to go make something yummy? Life is short, eat dessert! HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Are you looking for holiday gift ideas for kids? Our therapists have suggested toys and games they use in therapy that can be purchased for our Centers as a holiday gift. This Wish List also makes a great gift guide, as it is therapist recommended!

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley Speech & Language Therapy click here.