Tag Archives: development

My Child Needs Deep Pressure! What Do I Do?

By: Laura Bueche, MOT OTR/L

Sensory Processing

Our bodies are constantly receiving and processing sensory information around us. Our senses give us the information we need to function in the world. We receive information from stimuli both outside and inside our bodies. Our sensory systems include auditory (hearing), vision, olfactory (smell), vestibular (movement), tactile (touch), gustatory (taste), and proprioceptive (body awareness). Sensory processing is the neurological process that organizes and interprets all the sensations we receive so we can function effectively within the environment.

What is Deep Pressure?

CatherineDeep touch pressure is a combination of a tactile and proprioceptive input which is often provided by firm holding, firm stroking, cuddling, hugging, and squeezing.

The proprioceptive sense refers to the sensory input and feedback that tells us about movement and body position. Proprioceptive receptors are located within our muscles, joints, ligaments, tendons, and connective tissues. It is one of the “deep senses” and could be considered the “position sense” (as Carol Stock Kranowitz refers to it in her book entitled  The Out-of-Sync Child.

If a child is having difficulty processing proprioceptive input, they’re brain isn’t receiving proper messages regarding whether muscles are being stretched, whether joints are bending or straightening, and how much of each of these is happening, children may seek out more intense forms of proprioceptive or deep pressure input. Kids with tactile and/or proprioceptive sensory processing dysfunction may seek out deep pressure input to send a stronger message to their nervous system. Deep pressure may help them “dampen” averse tactile sensations or may give them a greater sense of where their body is in a space.

 

Indicators of Deep Pressure Seeking

  • Tensing/squeezing muscles of the body
  • Crashing into furniture
  • Enjoys climbing into small spaces
  • Head banging
  • Grinding teeth
  • Pushing on chin
  • Stomping feet
  • Mouthing non-food items
  • Toe walking
  • Leaning into people

brushingDeep Pressure Input Activities

Deep Pressure Input Benefits

Deep pressure touch has been found to have beneficial effects in a variety of clinical settings (Barnard and Brazelton 1990, Gunzenhauser 1990). In anecdotal reports, deep touch pressure has been described to produce a calming effect in children with psychiatric disorders. Deep pressure stimulation, such as rolling up in a gym mat, has been used to calm children with autistic disorder and ADHD (Ayres 1979, King 1989). Lorna King (personal communication, 1990) reports that children with sleeping problems appear to sleep better inside of a mummy sleeping bag, which adapts to fit the body snuggly. It also has been used to reduce tactile defensiveness in children who cannot tolerate being touched. McClure and Holtz-Yotz (1991) found that deep pressure applied by foam-padded splints on the arms reduced self-injurious behavior and self-stimulation in an autistic child. (Ayers, 1992)

Deep touch stimulation is beneficial to typically developing babies (Barnard and Brazelton 1990, Gunzenhauser 1990). Institutionalized babies who received supplemental tactile stimulation, mainly deep touch pressure, developed more typically (Provence and Lipton 1962). Premature babies who receive stroking and tightly bound swaddling also are reported to show definite benefits (Anderson 1986, Field et al. 1986, Lieb et al. 1980). (Ayers, 1992)

If you think you child is seeking deep pressure input or has a sensory processing disorder, schedule an occupational therapy evaluation before trying to implement a sensory program at home. For more information on our occupational therapy program visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

 

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10 Things You May Not Know About Our Parent Resource Library

By: Family Services Department

  1. Our Mary Alice D’Arcy Parent Resource Library at our Villa Park center was created for you! A key part of our mission is to “…provide support for families who love and care for (infants, children, and adults with disabilities) …” We have listened and responded to the many questions we receive by finding highly rated books on those topics.
  2. We have listed many of the books housed in our library onto goodreads to make it easier to browse our shelves from any location. Click HERE to see our goodreads profile and view our book list.
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  3. We add new books all the time and they may not yet appear on this list. Please ask!
  4. Our children’s section is separated from the parent books and off to the right side of the library. These books can be great for siblings to help understand a diagnosis or for when talking with your child about challenges they may be facing.
  5. Our Naperville and Elgin centers also have small library collections with many of the same books.
  6. We labeled our “bookshelves” on goodreads to match our library shelf subjects. If you find a book you want to look at and it is listed as being on the “behavior” shelf on goodreads, you will find it on that shelf in our library.  If you have any trouble finding a book you are looking for please ask a staff member for help.
  7. Checking out books is EASY! Here’s how:
    Books may be signed out for 3 weeks
    • Please complete the card located in a pocket inside the front cover of the book and return the card to the front desk
    • Please return all books to the front desk

Enjoy!

8. One of the most popular books (please ask for help if it is checked out when you look for it!) is:

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  1. We love feedback, suggestions and requests. There is a place for parent comments located inside the back cover of most of the books.  Please share your opinions so we can let other parents know what has been most helpful. If there is a book or a topic we don’t seem to have please come on in and ask.  We have staff bursting with ideas and suggestions and file cabinets full of referral sources we would love to share! If you cannot find a staff member please ask the front desk for assistance.
  2. Our expert social service staff encourage you to come on in, hang out, use the computer, look over the books, read a book to your child, ask a question or simply stop in and chat with a staff member – we are here for our families and we are great listeners and problem solvers!

For more information on our family services including additional resources visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/explore-resources/for-caregivers/family-services.html.

Myths and Facts About Raising Bilingual Children

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons, M.S. CCC-SLP

There are many misconceptions about raising bilingual children.  Many well-meaning professionals can perpetuate myths that scare parents away from speaking to their children in their native language.  However, research supports the many benefits of being bilingual.  Let’s disprove some of these perpetuated myths:

MYTH: Parents should primarily speak English to their children regardless of their native language.

01_Lucas_VasquezFACT: Parents should be supported to speak in the language they feel most comfortable.  Speaking their primary language will provide the most complex language models.  If a parent is learning English himself, he will not provide rich vocabulary and grammar models.  The child will be exposed to simpler linguistic models than if the parent spoke to the child in their stronger language.  Providing a more complex model in the stronger language is more beneficial to the child than reducing to just speaking English.

MYTH: Raising my child bilingual will cause a delay in language development.

FACT:  Children all over the world learn more than one language without developing speech or language problems. Bilingual children develop language skills just as other children do. If a child has a speech or language disorder it will show up in both languages.  However, these problems are not caused by learning two languages.

MYTH: Raising my child bilingual will cause him to suffer academically.

FACT:  Research indicates that being bilingual makes your brain healthier and more actively engaged.  It leads to better executive functioning skills, enables one to learn more languages easily and have more job opportunities in the future.

MYTH: My child will feel different than his classmates if he speaks another language.

FACT: Your family’s heritage and culture is a valuable part of who your child is.  Keeping him connected to your community and feeling secure in his identity will give him more self-confidence.

MYTH:  I shouldn’t expose my child to my family’s native language because he has a language disorder.

FACT:  It is a common misperception that when a child has a language disorder, its better to reduce to one language.   It may seem counterintuitive to continue to expose the child to two languages but the evidence does not indicate that bilingualism will impede a child’s English language learning growth.  If it is important to the family, they should feel supported in their decision to raise their child with two languages.

MYTH: I should only speak English to my child until he starts school so that he is ready academically.

FACT: The younger a child is, the easier it is for them to learn a language.  The most effective ways to raise bilingual children are:

Successive language learners: Speak to your child exclusively in your family’s native language. Developing a strong foundation in the first language will pave the way for developing the second language of English.

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Simultaneous language learners: Use two languages from the start.  Some families choose to have one parent speak their native language and the other parent speak English.  Some families choose to speak a given language on certain days of the week or certain times of the day.

If you are concerned about your child’s language or other development, take our free online developmental screening tool for children birth to age five. The Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) will showcase your child’s developmental milestones while uncovering any potential delays. Learn more at askeasterseals.org. 

Executive Functioning Skills: CO-OP Model Part 3: Time Robbers

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

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I was recently asked by a parent to elaborate more on a concept I integrate within GoalPlanDoCheck called “time robbers”.  The concept of “time robbers” was first introduced to me at a continuing education class taught by speech therapist Sarah Ward. A “time robber” is something which keeps us from doing other things which have more value or importance to us.

The concept of “time robbers” can be a fun way to call to attention all the little (or maybeclock not so little) things we do that take away from our goal. Time robbers can occur to everyone. They can occur anywhere. They can also be anything. Time robbers can be things we do as well as things other people do. Sometimes time robbers are imposed upon us by others or circumstances and are less in our control. Other time robbers are self-inflicted. Some examples of time robbers are being hungry, tired, or worried. They can also be sounds in our environment, noises/shows on the television, or games on the iPad.

The following is a handout I developed to help introduce the concept to children.

What? Time robbers are a little like impulses. Impulses are the feelings we have to do or say something…sometimes without even realizing! Time robbers are just like impulses. They are the things that we do that take away time from our overall goal and plan.
When? Time robbers can happen all the time. They don’t have to be limited to just school or home.
Examples? Time robbers can come in all forms. They might as easy as a thought that should remain in my thought bubble or as complicated as getting your bike out, riding to the store, buying a snack, and returning home to finish your homework. Other examples can be having the television on when doing homework, wanting to play longer with a favorite toy, arguing, changing ideas, etc.
Consequences? Time robbers are not our friends. They take away time from us getting things done. If they take away from one thing it means there is less time to do something that might be more preferred or fun.
How to fix? Practice your thought bubbles and keeping any time robbers hidden away inside our brains until we are finished with our goal and initial plan. STOP and Think – monitor your space, time, objects, and people. Think if this is an expected time to bring up your time robber.

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When beginning any new strategy or tool with your child, I often find it helpful to first identify in yourself examples and then start calling attention to different tools you use to help defeat the different time robbers. When your child is starting to recognize time robbers, then it is a good time to introduce the concept to your child to help identify and address them.

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s occupational therapy services visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

 

10 great books to help you talk to children about disabilities

By: Karyn Voels Malesevic, Au.D., CCC-A

Many of us have struggled to find the right words when talking to our kids.  Knowing how much to say, or how little, or what type of words to use can be a challenge.

Enter the power of a good book!

Sitting down and reading a book about a character that may have the same disability as your child can be a great way to start the conversation.  Sharing stories is also a great way to help siblings and classmates understand and appreciate differences, or to help your child(ren) prepare for a big transition or difficult news.  A good book helps finding the right words much easier.

We’ve complied a list of ten great children’s books to help confront tough issues.

To view our complete list of book recommendations for parents, caregivers and children, follow us on Goodreads.

  1. Rolling Along with Goldilocks and the Three Bears by Cindy Meyers- In this story baby bear uses a wheelchair, goes to physical therapy, and ultimately makes friends with Goldilocks. The story unfolds many of the familiar scenes of the classic tale ending on a hopeful note.349042
  2. Wonder by R.J. Palacio- August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity preventing him from going to a mainstream school that is until now. He’s about to start 5th grade and being the new kid can be hard. Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?
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  3. We’ll Paint the Octopus Red by Stephanie Stuve- Bodeen- Six-year-old Emma is gladly waiting for  the birth of her new baby brother or sister. She imagines all of the things they can do together. They’ll go to Grandpa’s farm to feed the calves, ride in the back of the mini-van making faces at the cars that go by, fly on airplanes, and someday, they’ll even go to Africa on a safari.264878
  4. Kids Talk about Bullying by Carrie Finn-  People make fun of me for wearing glasses. What should I do? Super Sam the problem solver will give you some strong advice on bullies.1172876
  5. The Way I Act by Steve Metzger- This vividly illustrated story is a fun way to show children how their actions may affect others. This book explores a variety of attitudes and traits, like compassion and bravery. Children will instantly recognize and identify scenarios such as meeting new kids, romping on the playground, and finishing a puzzle. Each scene illustrates proper ways to act and encourages readers to do the right thing.10253343
  6. Rolling Along: The Story of Taylor and His Wheelchair by Jamee Heelan- Taylor and Tyler are twin brothers and best friends. But the twins are different in one significant way: Taylor has cerebral palsy, while Tyler does not. Taylor explains to readers why wheelchairs allow many people to be more independent. This triumphant story offers a valuable look at both adjusting to a wheelchair and facing physical limitations with boundless energy and determination.1403392
  7. No, David! by David Shannon- When author David Shannon was five years old, he wrote a semi-autobiographical story of a little kid who broke all his mother’s rules. He chewed with his mouth open (and full of food), he jumped on the furniture, and he broke his mother’s vase! As a result, all David ever heard his mother say was “No, David!” Here is his story.1062516
  8. Nobody Knew What to Do: A Story about Bullying by Becky Ray McCain- This story tells how one child found the courage to tell a teacher about Ray, who was being picked on and bullied by other kids in school.805575
  9. Sara’s Secret by Suzanne Wanous- This author skillfully manages to go beyond the message to the heart of Sara’s guilt and embarrassment. Sara and Justin are more than stiff cardboard characters, and their humanity poignantly validates the feelings of children who have disabled siblings. Haas’ fluid, striking watercolors convey Sara’s emotions with an intensity that is well matched to the text.3937661
  10. Let’s Talk about It: Extraordinary Friends: Let’s Talk About It by Fred Rogers- How do you get to know someone in a wheelchair? Sometimes it’s hard to know where to begin. In his characteristically wise and gentle way, Rogers challenges the stereotypes that often plague children with special needs and celebrates six children who are extraordinary friends.

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There are many great books out there, too many to list here!
Click this link to take you to our virtual bookshelves.  Here you will find the entire list of our recommendations, all available to check out in person at our Parent Resource Library.  Your local library should have many of these as well.

Another extensive list of books can be found HERE.

If you find your family confronted with a serious  issue or unexpected change that impacts your child, it’s important to prepare yourself before having a difficult conversation.  Here are some resources to help guide your first steps in talking about illness, death, divorce or autism:

  1. Helping children when a family member has cancer HERE.
  2. Helping your child deal with death HERE.
  3. An age by age guide for talking with kids about divorce HERE.
  4. Telling your child that they have autism HERE.

It often helps to connect with a professional who can answer questions and recommend an approach.

 

To connect with a social worker or parent liaison at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/explore-resources/for-caregivers/family-services.html


 

SpellLinksLearn more about how Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley is supporting literacy for children with special needs, check out our latest course offering in partnership with Dr. Jan Wasowicz and SPELL-Links.
Building the Brain for Literacy: Prerequisites for Successful Spelling & Reading A Multi-Linguistic, Prescriptive Assessment and Speech to Print Instruction

The Interactive Metronome

By: Kara Lyons, OT

blog12TIMING IS EVERYTHING
Did you know that precise timing is responsible for the synchronous interaction within our brain that connects physical movement and cognitive processes?

Why is timing important? To name a few, timing is responsible for a person’s ability to walk without falling, catch or throw a ball, jump, climb a ladder, play music, and speak without stuttering.

Research suggests that training with the Interactive Metronome, or IM, supports the interaction between critical brain networks, specifically the parietal-frontal lobes, which are often associated with general intellectual functioning, working memory, controlled attention, and executive functions (McGrew, 2002).

What is the Interactive Metronome (IM)?

The IM is a computer based interactive program that provides a timed rhythmical beat, or metronome, which works to pace an individual’s movements.

In this program, an individual synchronizes a variety of upper and lower extremity exercises to a precise computer-generated tone heard through headphones.

The IM responds to a client’s physical movement by providing real-time auditory and visual feedback in milliseconds, indicating whether they are in sync with the beat, or they are too early or late.

blogggg1What skills does the IM target?

• Improved timing, rhythm, and synchronization in the brain
• Motor planning, motor control, and bilateral coordination
• Attention, working memory, and processing speed
• Speech/language and social skills

Who could benefit from the IM?28321120_Unknown (1)

Pediatric population
Individuals with ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Processing Disorder, children with developmental delays or learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, auditory processing disorder, and dyslexia.
Adult population
Post brain injury, stroke, or concussions, adults with ADHD, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s/Dementia, and amputees

How do you get started with this program?

• The first step is to be evaluated by an occupational, speech, or physical therapist that is also trained and certified as an Interactive Metronome Provider. You may find a provider in your area through the Interactive Metronome’s locator index.

• The assessment will consist of a comprehensive speech, occupational, or physical therapy evaluation, including an IM assessment, information sharing with the family and evaluating therapist, clinical observations, and other objective measures or evaluation tools (which may provide additional information regarding strength, coordination, fine and visual motor control, and/or speech and language abilities). At that time, the evaluating therapist will identify concerns expressed by the family and work to establish functional goals for the child.
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• The IM assessment provides data on the child’s current level of functioning, including their timing tendencies, attention to task, their ability to motor plan, sequence, or coordinate the movement patterns.
• The evaluating or treating therapist will determine if the client is appropriate for the program before customizing a treatment plan and program.

• REPETITION and FREQUENCY are critical for making lasting, functional changes in the brain.

• It is recommended that a client participate in the program at least 3 times per week for a minimum of 30 minutes of training per session.

THE IM HOME UNIT

blog123The IM home training unit is an option for families to meet the minimum recommended frequency or if the client is unable to attend therapy in the clinic setting.

To purchase and utilize the IM home program, a client must establish a relationship with an IM home certified therapist (also available through the IM Locator Index). The treating therapist will customize the child’s treatment plan, provide ongoing feedback, and adjust the plan as needed.

Overall, the IM is an excellent adjunct to traditional therapy services as it provides objective data (the child’s performance over time, measured in milliseconds) to support functional outcomes. If you are interested in the Interactive Metronome or feel it may be appropriate for your child, speak with your treating therapist.

For more information on the Interactive Metronome, including evidence to support the program, please visit https://www.interactivemetronome.com

To learn more about Interactive Metronome services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley and set up an evaluation contact us.

 

 

References:
McGrew, Kevin (2002). The Science behind the Interactive Metronome: An Integration of Brain Clock, Temporal Processing, Brain Network, and Neurocognitive Research and Theory. MindHub Pub, 2.

Throw Like A Pro

By: Cassidy McCoy PT, DPT

Baseball season is back, and summer is almost here, so let’s get out and get playing. Since Chicago is now home to the World Series Champions, here are some pointers to get your kids throwing like the pros.

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Initial Position

1. Face the side so your non-throwing arm is facing the target.

2. Using your elbow or fingertips, line yourself up so you are pointing directly at the middle of the target.

 

 

baseball blog 1The Throw

1. The Wind Up: Bring your throwing arm up so your elbow is bent at a 90 degree angle and is in line with your shoulder. The majority of your weight should be in your back foot.

2. Step forward with the leg opposite your throwing arm (toes pointed forwards) as you begin to bring your arm forward gradually shifting your weight into the front foot.

3. The Release: Should occur as your arm comes over your head, slightly higher then the forehead.

 

The Follow-Through (End Position)baseball blog 2

  1. The majority of your weight should be in your front foot, with the heel of your back foot, or the entire foot, lifted off the ground.
  2. Your arm should fully move diagonally across your trunk ending at the hip/leg opposite of the throwing arm, with your trunk rotated so your shoulder are facing forwards (towards the target).

Visit our website for a list of summer community based therapy programs such as Physical Therapy to work on the fundamentals of sports, emphasizing coordination, timing, physical fitness and fun! Click here for more info.

Tips For Fitness-Focused Activities: Run, Golf, Bike & More

Fitness-focused activities are a great complement to a child’s therapy sessions, and an opportunity to work on therapy goals while also participating in an athletic or recreational activity.  By encouraging involvement in new activities for children of all abilities, they are learning the importance of health and wellness at a young age.

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The benefits of fitness-focused activities are far-reaching and can impact a child in many ways.

“We all need to challenge ourselves in order to reach our potential. Our job as therapists is to to see that potential in others and encourage kids to try activities that are outside their comfort zones, so they will truly be all they can be.  Any fitness or recreational activity that interests a child is worth pursuing for the benefits it provides physically as well as emotionally, cognitively and socially.”  – Laura Znajda, PT, C/NDT

Physical Wellness
Children of all abilities should participate in athletic and/or recreational activities as physical fitness is important for ALL.  Physical fitness, as defined by the American Physical Therapy Association, is “a dynamic physical state – comprising of cardiovascular/pulmonary endurance; muscle strength, power, endurance and flexibility; relaxation; and body composition – that allows optimal and efficient performance of daily and leisure activities.”

Just because as individual has a disability, does not mean that physical fitness is any less important.

Building Confidence
Participating in activities outside of a child’s comfort zone help support their emotional development.  Trying something new can be intimidating and challenging. Keep the focus on what makes the activity fun and avoid getting caught up in the competition. Every child approaches new activities differently, but it’s ok to remind them that no one is good at everything.  No one!  You can help temper frustration by celebrating every improvement – no matter how small, and sharing your own example of a time that practice and persistence led to success.

Socialization
Physical activities take many forms and are a great opportunity to increase peer interactions, build friendships and promote health and wellness for the whole family. Embrace a child’s interests and find ways to involve friends and family.

Setting Goals and Staying Motivated
Community based therapy programs and special recreation can target individualized therapy goals. For example, a child with hemiparesis might be working on running in order to use both sides of her body more fluidly, as needed for natural arm swing while walking. A child with sensory processing challenges might be building the strength needed for wall climbing so that he can include this activity in his weekly routine to assist with state regulation.

Motivation comes from finding ways to turn therapy activities into games with friendly competition, involving the whole family and plenty of cheering!

Therapy activities include dynamic warm-ups which may include animal walks, relay races, and jumping games; a progressive walk/run/bike program building up to increased time running/biking and increased overall distance; client-specific strengthening and agility tasks to target weak muscle groups and to promote the symmetry of movement required to efficiently run or ride a bike; and stretching to promote muscle flexibility and adequately cool our bodies down.”
– 
Laura Basi, Physical Therapist


How to Get Involved

Look for organized activities in your community that help bridge the gap between individual therapy and daily life.  Here are some examples of upcoming events at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley that present ways for skills to carry over into home, school and the community.

May 6, 2017              
Run for the Kids: Superhero Hustle 5K Run/2 Mile Walk
Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, Villa Park, IL
This superhero themed run/walk is a family-friendly event for all ages and abilities.
Register here

  • Set a goal to run the race, roll or drive the distance in a wheelchair or take a few unassisted steps across the finish line.

    Participants of the Hustle for Health community based therapy program are training to run all 3.1 miles of the race independently.  The Hustle for your Health program began because many children struggled with the 1-mile run in their school P.E. class. A 10-12 week training program is intended to target running pattern and cardiovascular endurance so that participation in community run/walk events becomes a reality.

June 9, 2017              
Golf Outing in Partnership with Freedom Golf Association
Cog Hill Golf & Country Club, Lemont, IL
Enjoy 18 holes of golf and help bring the joy of golf to children with disabilities.
Register here

  • Try something new by learning the game of golf in an adapted golf clinic.

    The golf clinic welcomes children of all abilities to participate in the fun with adapted clubs and equipment and 1:1 training from expert golf coaches from Freedom Golf Association.

    To register for this golf clinic email spike@eastersealsdfvr.org by May 1.

September 17, 2017               
2nd Annual Bike for the Kids
Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, Elgin, IL
Choose a cycling distance ranging from 12 – 100 miles or participate in a 2.5 mile family ride.  Adapted bicycles and trailers welcome!
Register here

  • Go on regular bike rides and train as a family throughout the summer.

All proceeds from these events support infants, children and adults with developmental delays and disabilities at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley. For a complete list of upcoming events visit here.

Executive Functioning Skills: CO-OP Model Expanded

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

Recently I wrote a blog on how to develop and strengthen executive function skills using the CO-OP (GoalPlanDoCheck) model. I thought I’d take a moment and expand on a very important foundational skill.

“Do with me and not for me”

So often we have great intentions and we do for our children. This isn’t a bad thing; we want our children to succeed. It’s hard to see them struggling. When we do for our children we neglect one very important step in developing their executive function skills. We accidentally take away their ability to plan, prioritize, problem solve, manage their space/time/materials, and reflect.

If we do not expect our children to be an “active participant” in his or her life, then we take away the many opportunities to learn the daily life skills needed for adulthood and the ability for learning how to tackle and master challenges. Involving your child in daily activities and encouraging them to be an active participant builds a strong sense of competency and positive self-esteem. It helps provide the confidence that your child can do many things and learn to ask for assistance when things go wrong.

Getting your child involved doesn’t have to be an elaborate process. Take whatever you are currently doing for your child and give him/her a simple job with the task. If the child is used to doing “nothing” start very small. Any job, regardless of how small (e.g. hold the pillow and place it on the bed while you make the bed, put one or two dishes into the dishwasher, drop a few articles of clothes in the washer, raise his arms to put his shirt on, etc.) is a start.

The best therapeutic opportunities are often right in front of you. There are endless activities (e.g. cooking, laundry, shopping, bathing, etc.) that make up your day.  You can use all your little interactions for many opportunities to develop executive function skills. By taking a little more time, you can  get your child involved around the house. Instead of just doing, slow down and ask for help. You might find your child enjoys helping and you may even start making some new memories together!

Basi Family

By doing with your child, you have the opportunity to break down the task so your child can be successful. In the process your child then starts to learn that a goal (e.g. making a bed) has many steps to the plan (e.g. put on the fitted sheet, do opposite corners, put on the sheet, put on the duvet/comforter, hold open the pillow case and put in the pillow, place the pillows on the bed). When we do the goal sometimes we work with a team (e.g. you and your child) and sometimes we need to adjust our plan (e.g. having them help this time) and sometimes we check throughout the process (e.g. did we get all the pillows?). You should celebrate with your child by “doing it together” with praise, giving high fives, and other gestures of companionship that you and your child share together. In turn, your child feels productive and competent; driving a desire to learn more. Over time your child learns to feel “good” about doing, and the typical daily challenges that are now a major struggle start to melt away. The child becomes more eager to learn, rather than driven to avoid.

I briefly used GoalPlanDoCheck but let’s use the concept in two better examples. Let’s use the first example for getting your children ready for school and let’s use the second example to model tools you use to help yourself get ready. Both ways involve your children.

1) Helping Your Child Get Ready in the Morning

Goal– While first getting your child up in the morning, tell them “It’s time to get ready so our goal is for you to be at school on time.” Use the word goal so your child knows that is GettingReadyforSchoolyour expectation.

Plan– Talk to your child about the steps. “First we need to go the bathroom so we can wash your face and brush your teeth. This usually helps wake you up so you can focus on getting dressed all by yourself. When you are getting dressed all by yourself, mom and dad will be downstairs making your breakfast. You need to eat your breakfast and then grab your lunch so we can get you to school. Don’t forget to double check your backpack and make sure you have everything you need for school or any after school activities.”

Depending on your child and the age of your child, you might simplify the plan. You might use visuals to help your child remember the plan. There are tons of different strategies that can worked within each child’s individual plan that are tailored to his or her specific needs and specific interests to ensure motivation. Depending on your child you might also need to use incentives to help with motivation and time management.

Do– Divide and conquer. Depending on your child’s age, he or she would not be expected to do all the pieces of the plan.

Check– Keep talking to your child. “Did we get everything? Are we on time? What helped us stay on time? What were time robbers?”

2) Modeling Tools You Use to Get Ready in the Morning

Children learn through modeling. This is a great way to begin introducing your child to this concept as well as teach through modeling different strategies.

Goal– While first getting up in the morning and working with your child, talk aloud to them. Talking aloud is not something that comes naturally and must be practiced; however, talking aloud is a great strategy for modeling the development of executive function skills. Tell them “It’s time to get ready so our goal is for you to be at school on time.” Use the word goal so your child knows that is your expectation.

Plan– Talk to your child about the steps; however, instead of listing the steps like we did in the first example, we are going to focus on you and tools that you use. This is important for kids who just seem disorganized, can’t get their arousal level just right, and just need help. Modeling is great to let them know we all use a variety of tools and that tools can be helpful. Here is an example of a conversation you might have while getting ready with your child:

“It’s time to get ready so our goal is for you to be at school on time. I don’t know about you, but mom is feeling really tired today. I have to get up earlier than you so that I can help you get ready. Do you know what helps me wake up so I can focus on getting ready? I start my morning with a shower. Sometimes the feel of the water on my skin wakes me up. Let’s try washing your face since we don’t have time for a shower.”

Notice how in this example, you discussed with your child a tool you use (shower) and provided them with an option to try. This is a great way to model. There are lots of other dialogues you can have with your child to model tools. This was just one example.

Do– Looks the same as in the first example; however, depending on the tool you may or may not be modeling. Do in the example above was telling your child and then providing your child with an example to do together.

Check– Remains the same. In this stage, we are actively involving our child to think and problem solve.

Have fun with it and know that you are working on developing and strengthening your child’s executive function skills. Executive function skills are developmental and must be taught. When working with your child, you are setting a path toward greater independence. Start simple and build gradually.

If your child is not used to doing much, start with a couple of activities a day. Pick a time of the day when you are not feeling rushed and your child is not feeling stressed. This will give you practice in how to guide, assist, and engage your child. Once it starts to feel natural, expand the “we-dos” into many daily activities. Do them together, giving him/her a little part to play, and gradually expanding his/her role to build more competence.

You are an important part in the development of your child. The more you can help your child think about what they do and why, the more they will be able to use that thinking in any problem solving situation. As my other blog concluded, the overall goal is to teach your child how to work through a problem using a planned approach instead of acting impulsively.

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s occupational therapy services visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/occupational-therapy.html. 

Climbing and Bouldering Therapy: The Benefits to Rock Climbing

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

This summer, physical and occupational therapists are excited to provide therapy on the walls as part of our summer outreach program “Climbing and Bouldering.” The varied terrain offers countless opportunities for physical and sensory challenges.

Rock climbing has so many benefits for kids of all ages and abilities.15_Patrick_Krueger

  • Strengthening and endurance: Climbing walls require strength and flexibility to
    successfully maneuver. Kids develop hand and finger strength as they grasp and hang onto holds of all different shapes and sizes. Some of the holds are tiny and don’t have much to grasp. Making your way up a climbing wall also requires a great deal of core strength and leg strength as your hold yourself in space. All that movement and use of your arms, legs, and core will help develop endurance for other gross motor activities.
  • Sensory processing: Kids get great proprioceptive input (sensory input to the muscles and joints) and vestibular (movement-based) experiences as they power themselves up and over while using the different holds as well as glide back down to the floor from the top of the wall! For kids who experience gravitational insecurity, rock climbing can be an extreme challenge but can be graded to meet their needs. For example, kids who are reluctant to climb high up on the wall can work on moving from side to side first. Children who also experience tactile sensitivities could also be help by all the proprioceptive input into their hands to help desensitize prior to working with different textures.
  • Motor planning and visual spatial/perceptual skills: Climbing is an awesome way to help kids develop motor planning skills. Indoor rock climbing is a great puzzle just waiting for your child to solve! The holds are all different shapes and colors. Most climbing walls also have colored tape markings that show climbers different paths they can take up the wall. This makes it easy to give a child instructions (e.g. “step your right foot on the blue hold” or “find the next hold with green tape next to it”) to challenge their abilities. Also, climbing walls usually have “routes” with
    a variety of difficulty levels, making it easy to adjust the activity depending on the skill level of the child.

    15_Brady Pembroke

  • Bilateral coordination: When kids are rock climbing, they must use both sides of their body together, usually in an alternating pattern — right hand and right foot move up to the next level, followed by the left hand and left foot. Also, kids have to learn how to differentiate between the movements on either side of their bodies. They stabilize themselves with one foot/hand while motor planning how to grasp onto and step on the next holds with their other foot and hand.
  • Confidence: Allowing kids to move outside of their comfort zone in a safe and controlled environment will undoubtedly help to build their confidence and promote development of positive self-esteem.

If you think your child might benefit from this outreach group, please visit our website for more information on Climbing and Bouldering Therapy and check out other Community Based Therapy Programs for Summer 2017!