Tag Archives: feeding

What is Tongue-Tie and How is it Treated?

By: Valerie Heneghan, M.A. CCC-SLP/L

The topic of tethered oral tissues or tongue/lip tie is evolving and controversial among professionals in the medical field.  The controversy often stems from first diagnosis. Is it truly a tethered oral tissue? And second the remediation. Is surgery necessary or is the child able to compensate without intervention? 

As a parent, I know it is a difficult decision as you want the best for your children.  You want to support your child’s development without unnecessary medical procedures.  My suggestion is to work with a professional who has experience in this area who can discuss these considerations and how they impact your child specifically. 

When discussing considerations regarding tethered oral tissues (e.g., tongue, lip, and cheek) it is important to include these 4 components:  

  1. Symptoms of mother/infant
  2. Mobility
  3. Function
  4. Location

The conversation on whether to move forward with medical intervention should include symptomology, structures, and function.  One child upon visual inspection may look to have a tethered oral tissue without any symptoms. While another child may have a tethered oral tissue that is not as visually apparent, however may have several symptoms impacting activities of daily living.

Below are interdisciplinary symptoms that could potentially be attributed to tethered oral tissues that you may want to consider:

  • Breastfeeding issues: Nipple pain, difficulty latching, inefficient nursing (e.g., feeding until becomes fatigued rather than full, nursing around the clock, etc.)
  • Lack of weight gain or growth
  • Difficulty moving to solid foods or won’t tolerate a variety of foods
  • Difficulty with cup, straw or bottle drinking
  • Delayed production of single words or imprecise articulation
  • Dentition (e.g., gap in front teeth) or malocclusion
  • Open mouth posture or congestion
  • Asymmetrical motor skills (e.g., preference for one side at young age) or Torticollis
  • Issues with sensory regulation, fine motor skills or vision
  • Coordination or balance issues
  • Gut Health issues or GERD
  • Sleep apnea

What are the next steps? 

It is important to find a medical professional who has experience in this area. A Pediatrician, ENT, or Dentist can diagnose a tethered oral tissue.  Often a Speech-Language Pathologist or Lactation Consultant may be referred, as these professionals work closely with oral motor skills therapeutically.

If a frenectomy (i.e., surgical cut to release the frenulum) is warranted, seek a medical professional (e.g., ENT or Dentist) who has experience in the following:

  • Has knowledge and expertise in releasing tethered oral tissues  
  • Recommends post-surgical program (i.e., stretches, therapeutic feedings, etc.)
  • Procedural experience using both scissor and laser for best possible outcome.

For more information on Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley Speech-Language services, including those that treat children with Tongue Tie conditions, visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/speech-language-therapy.html

Help children receive the nutritional therapy they need!

By: Cindy Baranoski, MS, RDN, LDN – Pediatric Nutrition Therapist

Excellent nutrition is one of the most basic requirements for a child to grow and thrive. A study published by Pediatrics found that diagnosis-specific, structured approaches to nutrition issues among children with developmental disabilities significantly improved energy consumption and nutritional status. Yet, nutrition disorders and compromised nutritional status are very frequent among children with developmental disabilities. fun-with-food-054

Research shows that as many as 90% of children with a developmental disorder have at least one nutrition risk indicator. Nutrition problems can include failure to thrive, obesity, poor feeding skills, sensory disorders, and gastrointestinal disorders, to name only a few. Individuals with special needs are also more likely to develop co-existing medical conditions that require nutrition interventions.

Thanks to two significant grants from Hanover Township Mental Health Board and Special Kids Foundation, Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley can now offer nutrition services for children, regardless of insurance, in areas currently underserved immediately north and west of DuPage County. This includes full financial support for those uninsured, underinsured or on Medicaid; and partial support for those in Early Intervention or with insurance. Children who qualify will receive a nutrition evaluation and follow up nutrition therapy as needed.

Qualifications for children (birth to 21 years of age) to receive this service include:

  • Eligible medical diagnosis or identified eating concern  AND

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley Nutrition Therapy provides care that is difficult to find elsewhere in a community or medical setting. Training and specialties include assisting children with improved oral and digestive tolerance, modifications to help improve growth,  adjusting diet for improved variety, volume and complexity of foods and fluids, balancing the diet of those with food allergies or sensitivities, help with transitioning (off of or onto) a tube feeding, and homemade blenderized formula and diet modifications.
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Evaluations are performed at the Center, in the family’s home or community setting. Our goal is to provide optimal nutrition care to children with developmental disabilities through an inter-disciplinary approach, addressing their nutrition risks and disorders and helping them to lead healthier lives.

Please refer parents, other specialists or anyone else with questions about the program to our Nutrition Therapy intake coordinator, Christy Stringini, who can be reached at 630-261-6126 and cstringini@EasterSealsDFVR.org.

Learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley nutritional therapy and feeding clinic at www.eastersealsdfvr.org.