Tag Archives: games

Climbing and Bouldering Therapy: The Benefits to Rock Climbing

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

This summer, physical and occupational therapists are excited to provide therapy on the walls as part of our summer outreach program “Climbing and Bouldering.” The varied terrain offers countless opportunities for physical and sensory challenges.

Rock climbing has so many benefits for kids of all ages and abilities.15_Patrick_Krueger

  • Strengthening and endurance: Climbing walls require strength and flexibility to
    successfully maneuver. Kids develop hand and finger strength as they grasp and hang onto holds of all different shapes and sizes. Some of the holds are tiny and don’t have much to grasp. Making your way up a climbing wall also requires a great deal of core strength and leg strength as your hold yourself in space. All that movement and use of your arms, legs, and core will help develop endurance for other gross motor activities.
  • Sensory processing: Kids get great proprioceptive input (sensory input to the muscles and joints) and vestibular (movement-based) experiences as they power themselves up and over while using the different holds as well as glide back down to the floor from the top of the wall! For kids who experience gravitational insecurity, rock climbing can be an extreme challenge but can be graded to meet their needs. For example, kids who are reluctant to climb high up on the wall can work on moving from side to side first. Children who also experience tactile sensitivities could also be help by all the proprioceptive input into their hands to help desensitize prior to working with different textures.
  • Motor planning and visual spatial/perceptual skills: Climbing is an awesome way to help kids develop motor planning skills. Indoor rock climbing is a great puzzle just waiting for your child to solve! The holds are all different shapes and colors. Most climbing walls also have colored tape markings that show climbers different paths they can take up the wall. This makes it easy to give a child instructions (e.g. “step your right foot on the blue hold” or “find the next hold with green tape next to it”) to challenge their abilities. Also, climbing walls usually have “routes” with
    a variety of difficulty levels, making it easy to adjust the activity depending on the skill level of the child.

    15_Brady Pembroke

  • Bilateral coordination: When kids are rock climbing, they must use both sides of their body together, usually in an alternating pattern — right hand and right foot move up to the next level, followed by the left hand and left foot. Also, kids have to learn how to differentiate between the movements on either side of their bodies. They stabilize themselves with one foot/hand while motor planning how to grasp onto and step on the next holds with their other foot and hand.
  • Confidence: Allowing kids to move outside of their comfort zone in a safe and controlled environment will undoubtedly help to build their confidence and promote development of positive self-esteem.

If you think your child might benefit from this outreach group, please visit our website for more information on Climbing and Bouldering Therapy and check out other Community Based Therapy Programs for Summer 2017!

The Amazon Echo as an Accessibility Support

By: Judy Gardner, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Pathologist/Feeding Therapist

Amazon describes the Echo as a hands-free, voice-controlled device that uses Alexa (Amazon’s answer to Siri, Cortana and Google) to play music, control smart home devices, provide information, read the news, set alarms, and more.  It is exciting that people’s interactions with a computer device is much easier with no buttons to find and press.  The speech recognition still has some limitations but devices like the Echo show what the future may be around the corner.  The Echo works by constantly listening to a trigger word, by default, the trigger word is “Alexa” but you can change it in the Alexa app on your mobile device.    The communication devices we use in assistive technology allow a non-verbal child, or the child with some difficulty in oral speech to use the Echo independently.

Relationship Coordinator, Amy Liss, really enjoys this new device. “This is the most beneficial piece of technology I have ever received that can help me be completely independent.” Her favorite feature is playing daily Jeopardy trivia.

Some of these many uses:

Get quick answers for simple Web searches:  The most basic use of the Echo is to ask it questions it can answer by searching on the Web.  This ranges from simple math (Alexa what is 125 times 33?”) or spelling and definitions, etc.  The Echo is unique in that it will say the answers out loud  rather than requiring the user to read the responses.

Set alarms and timers:  So children with executive functioning is ability to self-regulate, including the ability to stay on task and manage and keep time.  For example, you can set a timer for someone to do an activity for one hour (“Alexa set a timer for one hour”) then set a second timer for each separate step that needs to be completed to accomplish the assigned task during that hour.  Just say “Alexa set a second timer for 25 minutes.  So you can have a 5 minute break.

Manage a to do list:  Just say “Alexa, add (name of to do item) to my to do list, or remind me to (name of task).”

Update your calendar:  “Alexa, add (event name) to my calendar.”  Gives the ability to stay organized.

Get your daily news fix:  (“Alexa, give me my Flash Briefing”)

Listen to Audible and Kindle books:  The Echo is a great way to listen to your books read aloud.  This can be a great way to use the Echo in the classroom setting.

wemoControl your lights:  Echo can be great way to control your home lighting using just your voice.  This can be especially helpful for those who have motor difficulties.  By installing the Hue Skill, you can get basic voice control of the lights in your home.

Control your appliances:  With a Wemo switch you can add voice control to any small appliance with an on/off switch (fans, lamps, etc.)

Listen to music and podcasts:  Echo supports a number of music services.

There are many more thing you can do with the Echo.  For more details go to www.luisperezonline.com for full details.  If you have a voice that is difficult to understand, have no fear- Alexa can use many speech generating devices to the rescue.

The Assistive Technology department at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley has received a grant to install Amazon Echo in their department.  Once it is installed we hope that you all will come down and give it a try.  Learn more about our assistive technology department by clicking here.

My OT Christmas List

By: Laura Bueche, MOT OTR/L

If you are looking for the perfect holiday gift for your child, here are some ideas to give your little one the input they are looking for over winter break. I also included other helpful websites, stores and catalogs for children with special needs.

Heavy Work and Movement

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Cuddle Me Sensory Tunnel– Great for therapy requiring tactile input and crawling practice as well as for sensory seeking kids to cuddle in for comfort. $49.99

scooter-blog.jpgScooter board– Develops sensory processing, coordination, balance and agility skills. $19.25

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Mini Kids Trampoline– Helps with muscle development, coordination and sensory processing. $68.99

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Wiggle Sit Cushion– provides subtle movement input and is a great seating option that often helps with focusing, while developing balance skills and trunk control. $14.90

 Deep Pressure Toys

 

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Weighted toys– A great sensory diet addition that provides comforting deep pressure input. $36.00

body_ot

Body Sock– excellent for providing calming/organizing deep pressure input, and for developing motor planning, spatial, and body awareness. $31.98

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Weighted blankets– Can calm anxiety and ease stress for some children with autism, sensory processing disorder, developmental disorders, and more. $ Prices vary

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Vibrating Pillow– Provides a sense of calm. $17.95

Balance and Coordination Toys

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Balance Board– helps develop the necessary skills for normal childhood activities which require good balance and coordination. $19.95

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Velcro Toss– Great for practicing motor-planning and timing skills. $8.49

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Zoom Ballgreat for bilateral coordination, motor planning skills, shoulder stability, and building upper body and core strength. $13.99

balance-stepping_otBalance stepping stones– Helps to improve balancing and coordination abilities. $29.49

 Tactile Exploration Toys

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Fidgets– Great for calming and alerting, to promote focusing and concentration, decrease stress, increase tactile awareness of fingers/hands and as a way to keep fidgeting fingers busy. $ Price Varies

orbies_ot

Water Beads – These make for fun sensory activities. $5.95

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Kinetic Sand– Great for a calming sensory experience and for tactile therapy play. $12.99

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Be Amazing Insta-Snow Jar– great for use in sensory tables for early childhood. $9.89

Adapted Toys

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Santa’s Little Hackers– A seasonal toy drive to adapt toys,  making simple modifications to the electronics of toys and giving them away. These adaptations make the toys accessible to individuals with disabilities so they can play independently.

Other Adapted Toy Resources:

Adaptive Tech SolutionsAdaptive Tech Solutions is a therapist owned and operated company that provides adapted equipment for individuals with disabilities at affordable prices.

Beyond Play: Features switch toys which are wonderful way to teach cause and effect and can help children develop a sense of control over their environment and self-esteem.

Other Resources:

I’m looking forward to checking out this new store in the Chicago area, Spectrum Toy Store.

Toys R Us Toy Guide for Differently-Abled Kids – Prepared by the National Lekotek Center, the catalogue is available at your local “R” Us store.

And last but not least, view our Amazon Wishlist for therapist recommended toys and games for all children’s developmental stages at bit.ly/eswishlist.

Screen Time: What is too much?

By: Cassidy McCoy, PT

Over the past few years, computers, tablets, phones, and TV seem to have taken over. Technology has begun to change the way our children interact with each other and us. However, how much time spent on these devices is considered too much?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released new recommendation for children’s media use.

The recommendations include:

  • <18 months: Avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting.
  • 18 to 24 months: If you want to introduce digital media, choose high-quality programming. Also, watch it with your children to help them understand what they’re seeing.
  • 2 to 5 years: Limit your children’s screen use to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs. You should watch it with them to help them understand what they are seeing and apply it to the world around them.boy-learning-with-therapist
  • 6 and older: Place consistent limits on the time spent using media, the types of media, and make sure media does not take the place of adequate sleep, physical activity and other behaviors essential to health.

What are the potential effects of too much screen time?

  • Obesity: Too much screen time equates to more time spent in sedentary positioning resulting in decreased physical activity and weight gain. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend for children to get at least 60 minutes of active play daily.
  • Sleep: Devices emit a blue light that mimics daylight, which stimulates you, leading to irregular sleep schedules and shorter duration of sleep with use of a device before bedtime.
  • Behavioral problems and violence: Screen time can be an effective way to calm down, but it should not be the only way they learn to calm down. Children should learn how to identify and handle strong emotions and come up with ways to manage them (such as deep breathing or problem solving)
  • Loss of social skills: Face-to-face communication or “talk time” is critical for language development. Research has shown that it’s that “back-and-forth conversation” that improves language skills—much more so than “passive” listening or one-way interaction with a screen.

What can you to to help?

  • Set time limits and expectations
  • Create “tech free zones” such a dinner table or bedrooms
  • Use screen time to promote education and development by utilizing appropriate programming.

For more information on Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit, eastersealsdfvr.org.

My Favorite Apps for Creativity and Interaction

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons M.S. CCC-SLP

Screen time for the purpose of passive consumption should be limited, as it does not activate a young child’s brain the way that real interaction with another person does.  Children learn most efficiently from back and forth communication, interaction in the real world and hands on play.

However, the screen can be a platform to promote back and forth interaction between a caregiver and child.  starblogHere are my favorite apps that promote creativity, collaboration and FUN interaction:

Video Star lets you easily create a music video in which you are the star!  Select the song, special effects, start shooting and then watch back the hilarious video that you created!

Songify transforms your recorded speech into a song.  It is SO FUN!!!songifyblog-copy

Puppet Pals is an app in which you can create your own unique puppet shows.  You can select the actors, background, animation and record the audio.

funnymovieblog-copyFunny Movie Maker lets you replace the mouth (or entire face) of a picture of a friend, celebrity, pet, etc.  You can record videos, adjust the pitch of your voice and add music to complete your video.   I think this could be an entertaining way to get that articulation homework done!

Book Creator is a simple way to make your own book right on you tablet.  In this app, you can customize books by adding pictures, text, video clips, music and even your own recorded voice.  What a great way for a child to re-tell a previous event or create bookcreatorblog-copytheir own imaginative story!

As with all media use, play these games along with your child. These apps may spur your creativity too!

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

Occupational Therapist Recommended iPad Apps

By: Laura Bueche, MOT OTR/L

No one can deny the powers of the iPad. The back lit animations, sound effects and interactive games make apps a great tool for kids to learn. Kids and adults are drawn to the technology?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting the amount of screen time a child has to “high-quality content.” They recommend children and teens should engage with entertainment media for no more than one or two hours per day and that television and other entertainment media should be avoided for infants and children under age 2.

But what games or content are high-quality? As a pediatric occupational therapist, I use iPad apps during therapy as a therapeutic tool to help kid’s develop skills.  Below are my favorite quality iPad apps.

Fine Motor Skills

Dexteria

 

Dexteria By: Binary Labs, Inc.
Price: $3.99

Dexteria turns your iOS device into a therapeutic tool that improves fine motor skills and handwriting readiness in children and adults.

dexteria jr

Dexteria Jr. By: BinaryLabs, Inc.
Price: $2.99

Set of hand and finger exercises to develop fine motor skills and handwriting readiness. The activities are specially designed for kids age 2-6.

dottodot

Dot to Dot Numbers and Letters Lite By: Apps in My Pocket Ltd By Apps in My Pocket Ltd
Price: Free

Trace through dot-to-dot puzzles for visual motor skills and visual tracking.

bugsandbuttons

Bugs and Buttons By: Little Bit Studio, LLC.
Price: $2.99

18 mini-games and activities that make learning fun. Count colorful buttons, recycle with marching ants or dainty ladybugs, recognize letters, solve bug mazes, and more!

 

Letter and Number Formation

letter&amp;number2 letter&amp;number

Letter School By: Letterschool Enabling Learning B.V.
Price: $4.99

Play to learn how to write all letters of the alphabet: abc – xyz and the numbers 1-10 with LetterSchool.

letterworkbook

Letter Workbook Home Edition By: BigCleaverLearning
Price: Free

Letter Workbook is an interactive educational app which teaches toddlers and children how to form and write letters. Through the simple, interactive guide children will learn how to write their ABC, improve vocabulary and have fun along the way!

myfirst number trace

My First Number Trace By: Neutre
Price: $1.99

Easy tracing for little fingers. Trace letters 1-10.

iwritewords

iWriteWords By: gdiplus
Price: $2.99

iWriteWords teaches your child handwriting while playing a fun and entertaining game.

 

Visual Perception

littlethings

Little Things By: KLICKTOCK
Price: $2.99

An innovative seek and find game. Search colorful collages built from thousands of little things. Randomized searches ensure a different game each time you play.

rushhour

Rush Hour Free By: Thinkfun Inc.
Price: Free

The original sliding block Traffic Jam puzzle, works on visual perception, problem solving, and attention.

 

visual attention
Visual Attention Therapy By: Tactus Therapy Solutions Ltd. Price: $9.99

Visual Attention Therapy helps brain injury and stroke survivors, as well as struggling students, to improve scanning abilities. It also helps rehab professionals to assess for neglect and provide more efficient and effective therapy for attention deficits.


Cause and Effect Apps

peekaboo

Peekaboo Forrest, Barn, or Fridge By: Night & Day Studios, Inc.
Price: $1.99

If you see something moving, tap on it to find out who it is!

ilovefireworks

Ilovefireworks lite By: Fireworks Games

Price: Free

Create beautiful fireworks display by easy tap operation! Touch on the screen, you immediately see breath taking fireworks in 3D graphics and real sounds.

touchofmusic

Touch of Music By: gamegou

Price: Free

Enjoy the freedom to play songs at your own beat while never missing a note.

 

Self Care Skills 

idohygiene

IdoHygiene By: C.E.T – THE CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
Price: Free

Learn the most common personal hygiene daily activities (teeth brushing, shampooing , hand washing, toilet training, taking a shower , public bathroom, etc.)

t-rex

T-Rex Toothbrush Timer By: PCAppDev Limited
Price: $0.99

Encourage your kids to brush their own teeth properly by following Dino brush his teeth!!

To learn more about Occupational Therapy at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

Gross Motor Play- Why Some Kids Won’t Participate

By Laura Znajda, PT, C/NDT
Manager of Community Based Therapy and Continuing Education

Summer is the ideal time for outdoor play, and children who love to run and climb are in their element. But children with very mild developmental challenges– or even no diagnosed problem at all— can have a great deal of difficulty learning new motor skills and keeping up with their peers on the playground.  Some children are mistakenly thought to be “clumsy” or “lazy” when they don’t try the advanced motor skills other children their age are mastering.

Physical and occupational therapists sometimes receive referrals to work with these children to strengthen their bodies so that they can gain skills more easily and keep up with their peers.  However, there is more to motor skills than just strength.  Pediatric therapists must analyze a child’s performance and consider all factors that might be impacting their success:Hannah_T

Flexibility
:  We all need normal range of motion in our joints to perform daily tasks, but outdoor play can require extreme ranges of movement as kids stretch their limbs to make that great play of the game or to access new parts of a play gym.  A restriction in range of motion at the hip or shoulder might make climbing the slide ladder difficult.  A neck range limitation could make it challenging for a child to scan the playing field for a teammate that is open for a pass.

Motor Planning:  Paraphrased from Jean Ayres, PhD, motor planning is defined as the act of planning movements inside the brain to complete a series of actions in the proper sequence.  Before a child even starts to move, the sequence of action is planned out in the brain.  When the child lacks experience with a particular skill, like pumping herself on a swing or hitting a ball with a bat, she might hesitate in order to give her brain time to make a plan for this novel task.  Typically, the time it takes to get started will decrease as the task becomes more familiar, but for some children this motor planning component does not come naturally and needs assistance.

Emmett_T.jpgBalance:  Children need to be able to balance on one leg long enough to lift the other leg to a raised surface or to kick a ball.  Even more importantly, they need dynamic balance—that is, control of their bodies while they are moving and balanced on one limb in order to reach out to the side to catch a baseball or make a soccer save.  A child with balance difficulties will seek out stable objects to hold when he has to lift a foot for any length of time or will avoid these activities altogether.

Coordination:    According to CanChild, a research center at McMaster University that organizes clinical  research concerning children with developmental conditions, coordination is a sequence of muscular actions or body movements occurring in a purposeful, orderly fashion (smooth and efficient).  We often think of coordination as the ability to use both sides of the body at the same time.  We need coordination to make the same movements with both arms and legs when we do exercises like jumping jacks.  And we need coordination to do different things with each body part, but all at the same time, such as dribbling a basketball while walking or running.  A child with coordination difficulties might need these advanced motor skills to be taught in a more graded manner before she can master them.Robbie_T.jpg

Motivation:  It might seem obvious that a child must be interested and motivated in an activity in order to be successful with it, however this important component of motor skill performance is sometimes overlooked.  Although research is inconclusive as to exactly how many repetitions are needed, we do know that a new skill requires at least hundreds of repetitions in order to become proficient.   If a child is not motivated to play a particular sport, he will not have the determination to practice a skill over and over and will not see the success that comes from that critical repetition.

Finally, strength is important. Just as necessary as all of these motor skill components; but not the only factor to consider when a child is hesitant or unsuccessful with outdoor play.

Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley therapists are expanding their ability to get to the bottom of why children don’t participate in outdoor play and develop new strategies to help them through a continuing education course taught by Lezlie Adler, OTR/L, C/NDT and Jane Styer-Acevedo, PT, DPT, C/NDT on September 22-23, 2016 at our Villa Park center.  Registration is open to all therapists at:  http://www.eastersealsdfvr.org/ce

References

Can Child, Institute for Applied Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 1C7  www.canchild.ca

Ayres, A. Jean, Sensory Integration and the Child, Western Psychological Services, 2005.

A New Perspective about the Playground

By: Bridget Hobbs, PT

Summer is finally here and your little ones are asking to go to the park.  So, pack a few snacks, slather on the sunscreen and take advantage of this free way to build confidence, make friends and gain gross motor skills at the same time.

Children learn best through play-based experiences and exploring the playground is great way for children to refine their gross and fine motor skills.  Here are a couple ideas for parents and caregivers to engage their children at the park in order to build not only bonding and fun, but to also build muscle strength, endurance and gross motor skills.

Here are some new or different ideas to incorporate to your little one’s playground fun:

Playground-28.jpgClimbing up the slide

As a child, you were likely told to just go down the slide.  Of course if there are children waiting to go down the slide, climbing up it is not a good idea.  However, if the park isn’t crowded, help your child bear walk (on hands and feet with bottom in the air) up the slide.  Doing this builds great core strength as well as cross-body coordination skills.

Using the dividers as balance beams

Playground-20.jpgThere are often railroad-tie type of dividers that divide the grass from the wood chips/foam surface under the playground equipment.  Challenge your child to go across these as they would a balance beam.  They can experiment with going forward, backward, side-stepping and even doing toe taps to the ground each step.  This activity helps with control of leg and core muscles as well as coordination skills that your child will use in gym class and on sports teams in the future.

Use hills to your advantage

If you participated in track or cross-country in high school, you know that training on hills was a vital component to the big picture of a race.  Make hills fun for your little one by rolling down them like a log to help with development of the vestibular system.  You can also really challenge them by bear walking or crab walking up or down the hill.

Don’t avoid the climbing wall

Playground-45.jpgChildren as young as toddlers can enjoy the climbing wall with help of their parents.  Even if you have to support their body, children learn motor planning and sequencing by deciding where to best place their hands and feet to navigate the wall.   A bonus is that the small muscles in the hand are strengthened by grasping the holds, which can lead to improved ability to write and play ball sports in the future.

There is a lot of research that clearly links play with brain development, motor and social skills.  Playgrounds provide different textures, sensory experiences and motor planning opportunities for children to help build their development.  So, think outside the box the next time you are at the park with your child and try to incorporate these different ways to assist with their development.

For more information on physical therapy and play based therapy services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit our website.

*Above images by Molly Gardner Media

 

Getting Back to the Basics this 4th of July

By: Kelly Lopresti, Director of Child Development, The Lily Garden Child Care Center

The warm summer weather is perfect for a Fourth of July celebration that incorporates easy patriotic activities. Think back to your own childhood outdoor experiences in the summer months with nights playing kick the can and flashlight tag.  4thWe can show our kids how to have a great 4th of July celebration by adding a few throw back activities from our youth.  Below is a list of list of easy activities that will keep kids busy, laughing and having a ton of fun during your holiday weekend.

Potato Sack Race: Bring back the classic potato sack race for your Fourth of July party. All you’ll need is a handful of bags (even old pillow cases will work) and a group of people. Line up the bagged participants and send them on their way laughing toward the finish line.

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Fun with the Brady Bunch kids.

Fun Tip: Choose festive bags, such as red, white, and blue pillow cases, or decorate your own potato sacks with the image of the flag or the Statue of Liberty.

IMG_1410Spoon Race: We named this Fourth of July game for one of our nation’s founding fathers, and it’s sure to be a hit. It’s the Abraham Lincoln Spoon Race.

  1. Divide the kids into two teams and designate a starting point and finish line.
  2. At the starting point, place a bowl of pennies and two spoons or ladles (one for each team); at the finish line, place two empty bowls (one for each team).
  3. One at a time one person from each team must fill the spoon with as many pennies as possible and then race to the finish line to discard them into the team bowl.
  4. Here’s the catch: Any dropped pennies must be picked up and returned to the spoon, and the player must return to the starting point. The first team to transfer all the pennies to the bowl at the finish line wins.
small-american-flags-on-wooden-sticks-5_161
Photo from Oriental Trading

American Flag Relay: Fill two large plastic buckets or bins with sand and insert small American flags. Use the same number of flags as participants.

  1. Designate a starting point and a finish line, placing the buckets at the finish line.
  2. Split the kids into two teams and have them form two lines at the starting point.
  3. On your “Go,” the first person in each line races to the bucket, grabs a flag, and marches back (for safety reasons, don’t allow children to run with the flags).
  4. The next person in line cannot go until the previous person has returned with his or her flag.
  5. The first team to capture all of its flags wins.

 

Other ideas:

  • Bike Decorating contest: Get the streamers and balloons ready and start decorating.
  • Hula Hoop Contest: Grab some Hula Hoops and a few wiggly participants to get the contest started. The person who can continue to hula the longest wins.
  • Baseball Throwing Contest: Incorporate America’s favorite pastime in your 4th of July celebration. The person who can throw a baseball the farthest wins. This game is best played at a park with an adult marking the distance each time.
  • Tug-of-War Contest: Create two teams to tug on opposing sides of a rope. Make three knots in the middle of the rope and a line on the ground between the teams. The team who tugs the furthest knot across the line wins
  • kiteFly a Kite: Let your patriotic spirit fly high into the sky this July Fourth. Make and decorate kites as a family and fly them in the backyard or at a park.
  • Baseball: Baseball is widely considered the all-American sport, which makes it a perfect Fourth of July game. Designate team captains and mark bases with bags of sand or painted twigs.
  • Patriotic Scavenger Hunt: For a festive and fun July Fourth game, send players on a scavenger hunt around the neighborhood. Include patriotic items on the list, such as red, white, and blue items; a nickel, in honor of Thomas Jefferson, who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and mini American flags.

For more ideas for a fun 4th of July weekend visit:

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley’s Lily Garden Child Care Center visit eastersealslilygarden.org.

7 Tips for Learning and Loving it!

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons M.S. CCC-SLP

Does helping your child with their homework ever feel like a laborious task?  These learning strategies will help you teach your child in a way that increases their understanding and retention.  Above all, these tips are meant to make the learning journey an enjoyable experience for all of those involved!

  1. Relate new information to known information.  Our brains are pattern-seeking devices.  They are always searching for associations between information being received and information already stored.  Linking new information with familiar information creates a connection that your brain will hold on to.blog
  1. Multi-Sensory involvement: the more varied experiences a child has with a new concept, the more neural pathways will be developed.  Whenever possible, teach the concept in a way that the child can experience.  If your child is learning about volcanoes, you can have them:

Role play being a volcano OR create a visual Venn Diagram comparing it to something they already know about.
volcan

  1. Active learning-the more a child is involved with the information, the more efficiently he will consolidate and recall it.  When a child passively receives information, he will understand and remember less.  Passively receiving informcloudation would be listening to a lecture or passing your eyes over the print from beginning to end in a chapter. Active learning would involve making predictions about the chapter, taking notes and discussing what was read or learned.
  1. Rhythm and Music: Rhythm and music stimulates both sides of the brain.  It activates our attention system and multiple neural pathways which facilitates memory and retrieval.   Create a song, set to a familiar tune that reviews key concepts in a curricular area.  Memorizing the 50 states, days of the week, or spelling words can all be easier when taught within a song or chant.
  2. Movement: Adding movement to an activity provides extra-sensory input and enhances attention.  Movement helps increase cognitive function while also helping children get rid of “the wiggles”.

It is also beneficial for children to have downtime for movement built into their days. Many studies have found that students who exercise do better in school.   Exercise triggers the release of a substance that enhances cognition by boosting the ability of neurons to communicate with each other. Below are some ideas to incorporate movement into learning:

  • Air writing letters
  • Playing charades to act out a history lesson
  • If the answer is correct, make a sign like a referee
  •  Jumping on the trampoline while doing math facts
  • Playing catch while reviewing information
  1. Humor– Humor wakes up the brain cells!  It also encourages attention and relieves stress.  Humor keeps learning an enjoyable experience for teachers, parents and children.  Using humor lets students have an increased feeling of safety in making an error or getting an answer wrong.  Make time for laugh breaks to keep your child alert and attentive while learning
  2. ReflectionDowntime is important to help the brain process new information and strengthen neural connections.  Have your child learn and study in small chunks of time.  Implement breaks for movement, listening to music, doodling or having a snack.

For more information on strategies for learning and about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley, visit: eastersealsdfvr.org.