Tag Archives: reading

Best Children’s Books on Disability

By: Sarah Peabody, Physical Therapist

According to the Center of Disease Control, developmental disabilities affect 1 in 7 kids in the U.S. and 1 out of 9 children under the age of 18 receive special education services. Explaining a disability to children can be difficult for many reasons. The children’s books below each have a unique way of illustrating what really matters. These books are a great addition to any home, school, library, or waiting room.

With inspiring messages and an emphasis on strengths, they help all children understand kids with different needs. These powerful messages share stories and celebrate victories of all kids in spite of a range of different disabilities. If you are struggling to find a way to start a conversation with a child or a child’s sibling, friend, classmates, or family, these are a great way to start conversations about disability and inclusion!

Books about kids with physical disabilities:

  • Hip, Hop, Hooray for Brooklynn Bunny: This book is great for encouraging children to persist in achieving long-term goals and to cooperate with wearing an orthopedic brace. This book focuses on the whole child working toward a positive outcome over time. Whether it’s jumping rope, or wearing a brace, the message of this book is to keep trying.
  • Danny and the Merry-Go-Round: One day while watching kids play and ride a carousel, Danny becomes frustrated by his inability to participate. It’s not easy to join in because he is living with cerebral palsy. Luckily, a little girl befriends him and they embark on an adventure. It’s a touching story, made more powerful for its way of showing children with disabilities that they are valuable people.
  • Meet ClaraBelle Blue (The ClaraBelle Series): Written by a mother of a child with cerebral palsy, this book celebrates differences by illustrating how much we all share in common. ClaraBelle’s favorite line is “I’m ClaraBelle Blue and I’m just like YOU!”
  • My Belly Has Two Buttons: This book was written for children who use feeding tubes, and the main character is excited to show and teach everyone he knows about it.
  • Ben’s Adventures: This series was written by a parent with a son with cerebral palsy. Ben shows that despite his disability, he can dream, he can play, and he can interact and have meaningful experiences.

Books about kids with autism:

  • Looking After Louis: The story of Louis, a boy with autism in a general education class, is told from the perspective of one particular classmate. This is a great book to explain to young children how autism can affect behavior and promotes understanding of others.
  • Andy and His Yellow Frisbee: When a girl notices that Andy spends most of his recess spinning a frisbee by himself, she befriends him despite his trouble connecting with others. It’s a great story, told through the shoes of Andy’s older sister, providing a great perspective on Autism that even the youngest kids can understand.
  • Ian’s Walk: Ian is nonverbal.  His older sister Tara takes him on a walk and is embarrassed that he does things out of the ordinary including staring at the ceiling fan in the drugstore and putting his nose against the bricks by the post office. But when he wanders off on his own, she must try to see the world through his eyes in order to find him.

Books with a focus on inclusion and coping with a disability:

  • We’re All Wonders: This story shows how one child copes with his own differences, and other’s reactions to them. The reader will find comfort in Auggie’s imaginative tactics and his positivity about being able to change the way others see him.
  • Susan Laughs: This book celebrates the similarities and differences between children with and without disabilities, and encourages acceptance and tolerance of differences. It’s not until the end of the book that Willis reveals Susan uses a wheelchair. It’s a simple, yet powerful, way to show how people aren’t defined by the barriers they face.
  • My Sister, Alecia May: This book is written from the perspective of a younger sister of a child with Down Syndrome. Although Alecia May can be hard to be around, she is a lot like other 6-year-olds. Rachel appreciates the unique qualities of her sister and learns to stand up for her when others tease her. A great book about inclusion!

Books about kids with a learning disability, anxieties/worries, and more:

  • Hudson Hates School: This book is a useful introduction to dyslexia for children. It reassures children that dyslexia should not be a barrier to success if it is properly recognized and managed.
  • Eagle Eyes: This book focuses on a child who has ADD/ADHD and learning difficulties.  It acknowledges the difficulties that Ben experiences at home and school because he has trouble controlling how he moves and thinks. The hallmarks of ADHD are discussed as well as ways to cope with them.
  • When My Worries Get Too Big: This is a great book that makes it easy for kids who struggle with anxieties to not feel so alone. The included stories are fun, engaging, and filled with encouragement to help kids come up with their own calming methods when anxiety issues arise.
  • I’m Not Weird, I Have Sensory Processing Disorder: If you have a child that struggles with sensory processing disorder (SPD), this book will help your child relate to the main character as she describes what it is like for her each and every day. This is a great resource to explain to others what it feels like living with sensory issues that affect them constantly throughout the day.
  • Whole Body Listening Larry at School: This is an excellent book to teach the concept of whole body listening and following directions. The story begins with two new students attending school who have trouble listening and following along with the class schedule, social cues, etc. Larry helps them by teaching them how to listen with “their whole body”.

Books geared towards siblings:

  • Sara’s Secret: This book explains the story of a grade school-aged child that has a brother with a severe disability. The main character struggles with not wanting her classmates at her new school to find out about her brother in fear of being teased. It is a beautiful message of acceptance and inclusion as the main character delves into her emotions and realizes the bond between she and her brother despite his difficulties, which is not any secret to hide.
  • We’ll Paint the Octopus Red: A great resource for those who are awaiting the arrival of a new baby brother/sister who has a disability (this book specifically geared towards Down Syndrome). It also has a great message that with help and patience, their sibling will be able to overcome any obstacle.
  • Leah’s Voice: Parents and educators can use this book as a great resource for teaching siblings, friends, and classmates about autism, inclusion, and acceptance. Although the focus is on a sibling with autism, its important message on the acceptance of differences and treating everyone with kindness is for all children.
  • Views from Our Shoes: This book includes numerous stories of siblings that share their experiences as the brother or sister of someone with a disability with a wide range of various difficulties. Their personal stories introduce young siblings to others like them and allow them to compare experiences.

For more information on the services Easterseals provides for children with disabilities, visit:http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/

10 great books to help you talk to children about disabilities

By: Karyn Voels Malesevic, Au.D., CCC-A

Many of us have struggled to find the right words when talking to our kids.  Knowing how much to say, or how little, or what type of words to use can be a challenge.

Enter the power of a good book!

Sitting down and reading a book about a character that may have the same disability as your child can be a great way to start the conversation.  Sharing stories is also a great way to help siblings and classmates understand and appreciate differences, or to help your child(ren) prepare for a big transition or difficult news.  A good book helps finding the right words much easier.

We’ve complied a list of ten great children’s books to help confront tough issues.

To view our complete list of book recommendations for parents, caregivers and children, follow us on Goodreads.

  1. Rolling Along with Goldilocks and the Three Bears by Cindy Meyers- In this story baby bear uses a wheelchair, goes to physical therapy, and ultimately makes friends with Goldilocks. The story unfolds many of the familiar scenes of the classic tale ending on a hopeful note.349042
  2. Wonder by R.J. Palacio- August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity preventing him from going to a mainstream school that is until now. He’s about to start 5th grade and being the new kid can be hard. Auggie’s just an ordinary kid, with an extraordinary face. But can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, despite appearances?
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  3. We’ll Paint the Octopus Red by Stephanie Stuve- Bodeen- Six-year-old Emma is gladly waiting for  the birth of her new baby brother or sister. She imagines all of the things they can do together. They’ll go to Grandpa’s farm to feed the calves, ride in the back of the mini-van making faces at the cars that go by, fly on airplanes, and someday, they’ll even go to Africa on a safari.264878
  4. Kids Talk about Bullying by Carrie Finn-  People make fun of me for wearing glasses. What should I do? Super Sam the problem solver will give you some strong advice on bullies.1172876
  5. The Way I Act by Steve Metzger- This vividly illustrated story is a fun way to show children how their actions may affect others. This book explores a variety of attitudes and traits, like compassion and bravery. Children will instantly recognize and identify scenarios such as meeting new kids, romping on the playground, and finishing a puzzle. Each scene illustrates proper ways to act and encourages readers to do the right thing.10253343
  6. Rolling Along: The Story of Taylor and His Wheelchair by Jamee Heelan- Taylor and Tyler are twin brothers and best friends. But the twins are different in one significant way: Taylor has cerebral palsy, while Tyler does not. Taylor explains to readers why wheelchairs allow many people to be more independent. This triumphant story offers a valuable look at both adjusting to a wheelchair and facing physical limitations with boundless energy and determination.1403392
  7. No, David! by David Shannon- When author David Shannon was five years old, he wrote a semi-autobiographical story of a little kid who broke all his mother’s rules. He chewed with his mouth open (and full of food), he jumped on the furniture, and he broke his mother’s vase! As a result, all David ever heard his mother say was “No, David!” Here is his story.1062516
  8. Nobody Knew What to Do: A Story about Bullying by Becky Ray McCain- This story tells how one child found the courage to tell a teacher about Ray, who was being picked on and bullied by other kids in school.805575
  9. Sara’s Secret by Suzanne Wanous- This author skillfully manages to go beyond the message to the heart of Sara’s guilt and embarrassment. Sara and Justin are more than stiff cardboard characters, and their humanity poignantly validates the feelings of children who have disabled siblings. Haas’ fluid, striking watercolors convey Sara’s emotions with an intensity that is well matched to the text.3937661
  10. Let’s Talk about It: Extraordinary Friends: Let’s Talk About It by Fred Rogers- How do you get to know someone in a wheelchair? Sometimes it’s hard to know where to begin. In his characteristically wise and gentle way, Rogers challenges the stereotypes that often plague children with special needs and celebrates six children who are extraordinary friends.

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There are many great books out there, too many to list here!
Click this link to take you to our virtual bookshelves.  Here you will find the entire list of our recommendations, all available to check out in person at our Parent Resource Library.  Your local library should have many of these as well.

Another extensive list of books can be found HERE.

If you find your family confronted with a serious  issue or unexpected change that impacts your child, it’s important to prepare yourself before having a difficult conversation.  Here are some resources to help guide your first steps in talking about illness, death, divorce or autism:

  1. Helping children when a family member has cancer HERE.
  2. Helping your child deal with death HERE.
  3. An age by age guide for talking with kids about divorce HERE.
  4. Telling your child that they have autism HERE.

It often helps to connect with a professional who can answer questions and recommend an approach.

 

To connect with a social worker or parent liaison at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit: http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/explore-resources/for-caregivers/family-services.html


 

SpellLinksLearn more about how Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley is supporting literacy for children with special needs, check out our latest course offering in partnership with Dr. Jan Wasowicz and SPELL-Links.
Building the Brain for Literacy: Prerequisites for Successful Spelling & Reading A Multi-Linguistic, Prescriptive Assessment and Speech to Print Instruction

How to Promote Reading Awareness in Young Children

By:  Kelly Lopresti, Director of Child Development & Christopher J. Lopresti, Reading Specialist

Each year at the beginning of March, school children kick off National Reading Month by celebrating the birthday of the beloved Dr. Seuss. Teachers design contests, family literacy events, and even pajama and pillow days to provide cozy mornings of uninterrupted reading. With help from Read Across America, the goal is to motivate kids to read every day of the year.

What about the little ones? Some think young children can’t participate. With a little help, they can enjoy National Reading Month too.

Literacy skills begin to develop at birth. At the Lily Garden Child Care Center we know how important early reading can be to help a child’s later success with reading and writing.

Skills closely related to later success with reading and writing:

  • Writing letters or one’s own name—the ability to write single letters in isolation, or write their own name
  • Alphabet knowledge—the ability to name letters and the sounds they make
  • Phonological awareness—the ability to hear and manipulate the sounds of spoken language (such as hear the beginning sound of a word)
  • Rapid letter or number naming—the ability to quickly name letters or numbers
  • Phonological memory—the ability to remember spoken information for a short period of time
  • Rapid object or color naming—the ability to quickly name random series of colors or objects

readOne way to develop these skills, give the gift of reading aloud to your child.

There are several benefits of reading aloud to your children. From bonding with your children to helping them strengthen skills in writing, creativity, listening and more. According to Scholastic’s Kids and Family Reading Report, the frequency of children being read aloud to at home drops sharply after age 5.  It drops even lower after age 8.  Try these resources to keep your reading bond strong with your kids.

  • The more you read aloud to your kids the more they will love reading.
  • It builds their vocabularies.
  • It develops background knowledge that they will need to understand the meaning of texts when they read on their own.
  • It inspires a lifetime love of reading and is a great way to model making reading a part of their everyday lives.
  • It’s one of the best ways to bond with your kids.

What you read aloud can vary day to dayMix it up – short, long, funny, factual – it’s all good.    

tipLiteracy Coach Reading Tip:  Please remember to read boldfaced headings and captions to your children in preparation for their academic careers.  The information therein is often used as source material for higher order thinking questions and can be used to expand their knowledge.

  • Chapter Books: Some read alouds go on for days and weeks because you may be reading a chapter a night of a longer novel or chapter book.
  • Picture Books: You may want to share a favorite picture book. Pick a former favorite of your child’s and revisit it.  They will love it just as much as they did when they were younger. Picture books are short 10-15 minutes. You can read picture books over and over again.
  • Poetry: Reading a short poem in the morning (or whenever you have time) can be a great idea. Find poems that relate to the season or what’s happening in their daily life.

Try one of these poems and see if your children like it.

Visit the below websites for a list of the top children’s book of 2016 and other resources.

Lily Garden Teacher’s Top Pickskeep-calm-and-love-reading

The Little Mouse and The Big Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood -The pictures are amazing.  I also like that the big hungry bear is mentioned throughout the book but never pictured.   It is left up to the child’s imagination to picture the bear. -Jenni Moses

How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long – It’s a story from a child’s perspective which the children can relate to. It’s a story about fun pirates! Every class I’ve worked with loves pirates and it’s something that holds their interest. Also, the author uses very descriptive words that really puts you in the story! -Katie Kwiatek

Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crocket Johnson – Harold lets his imagination go through art and his drawing! -Julie DeSalvo

We are in a Book by Mo Williams – I love this book! Mo Williams is such a creative author and I recommend all his work. The characters come to life well if you have a crazy imagination like I do or enjoy doing voices. Piggie reminds me of myself, so doing voices for Piggie and elephant is very fun. -Melissa Gonzalez

Go Away Big Green Monster by Ed Emberly – Toddlers love this book.  The children like to point to whatever facial feature is on that page.

The Bunny Rabbit Show by Sandra Boynton  – Toddlers love to sing along! -Christy Stringini

Naughty Little Monkeys by Jim Aylesworth -This book is about what happens when you leave twenty-six little monkeys home alone.  It’s a funny and colorful book that children want to read over and over again.  My son loved this book! -Kelly Lopresti

For more information about our inclusive daycare and our program philosophy visit: eastersealslilygarden.org.

Raising A Reader

 

By, Jessica Drake-Simmons, M.S. CCC-SLP

Everybody knows the importance of learning letters but the lesser-known imperative pre-reading skill is phonological awareness.  Phonological awareness refers to the ability to hear and play with sounds, syllables and words of spoken language.  Children who are able to think about the sounds in words have the necessary foundation of understanding how letters and sounds operate in print.

Phonological awareness is one of the best predictors of future reading success.

Phonological awareness skills develop with exposure and direct teaching.   Here are some ideas to facilitate phonological awareness skills in your child:

Infants & Young Toddlers

  • Sing fun songs or nursery rhymes
  • Increase awareness of environmental sounds (animal sounds, sirens, trains, etc.)
  • Change pitch and volume

2-3 year olds

  • Make up rhymes that include your child’s namereading blog2
  •  Read rhyming books; give your child the opportunity to fill in the rhyme
  • Do these words sound the same game? (barn-bat, house-house, hippo-house)

4-5 year olds

  •  Encourage your child to come up with rhyming words (this is a fun game for the car!)
  • Clap out the syllables of family members names
  • Talk about the first sound in words.  Have your child think of other words that start with the same sound.
  • Take a walk around your house looking for things that start with the same sound (e.g.,door, dishwasher, dog, etc.)
  • Listen for words that start with a given sound while reading a book
  • Have your child figure out the segmented word that you say (e.g., “For lunch, we are going to have mac-a-ron-i”)
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Visit our Pinterest page for developmental norms and more phonological awareness teaching ideas.

For more information about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley please visit EasterSealsDFVR.org.