Tag Archives: technology

What is an Augmentative and Alternative Communication Evaluation?

By: Laura Van Zandt, MS, OTR/L

Did you know October was National Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) month? AAC is a specialized area of clinical services. Here at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, we are very lucky to have several therapists who specialize in helping individuals find their voice through AAC. We have both Occupational Therapists (OT)  and Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) involved in a multidisciplinary team evaluation to determine the best strategies and/or communication systems to help a child learn to communicate.

As an OT, I first became interested in AAC when I was working with a little boy with autism who received a high tech speech output device. It was amazing to see how having his new voice provided so many new opportunities for him. It helped with his overall regulation as he now had a system to share his wants, desires, and needs.

assist-with-communicationAAC looks different from person to person and varies from low tech options, light/mid tech and high tech systems. If you think your child might benefit from AAC, our team evaluative approach may be helpful. Below is more information on what each team member does to best help your child.

  1. Many parents often have questions about whether or not a device will hinder their children’s ability to speak. This is absolutely not the case. Research demonstrates that AAC does not keep children from learning to speak.  In fact, users will make gains in language AND speech because AAC helps a child connect with others, produce successful communication, and provides consistent speech models. The child I described above, went on to learn a ton of new words after he got his device! When we begin to use AAC with toddlers, it doesn’t mean we believe they are never going to talk; instead, it often means, we believe they need a way to have a meaningful connection to others through a common language which helps serve as a bridge to spoken language.
  2.  Do try and introduce forms of AAC early. Using AAC can be very helpful for a toddler who is beginning to make gestures, eye contact or sounds to communicate messages, but isn’t yet using spoken language. Often these toddlers are frustrated they can’t communicate certain thoughts and messages. Once they start to see and learn the power of communication through signs, pictures, or more formal AAC apps/devices, they begin to feel a little less frustrated.

blog_visual3. Model, model, model. When using any type of AAC, we can never model enough. This means that everyone in a child’s life should use AAC too! As with all language learning, AAC is learned because those around the child speak the same language. If you think about it, early communication development (between birth – 12 months) is only modeling – caregivers communicating without any expectation while being connected with their baby using a common language. I love it when my clients bring their devices to therapy. If your child is already receiving therapy services, ask the therapist to use your child’s communication system during sessions to connect and engage with your child. When using AAC, continue to use verbal speech to model and help children understand the pictorial representation of language and develop the words.

Neela2

4. When you schedule an evaluation, you will see both an occupational therapist and a speech therapist trained in AAC. Both therapists are knowledgeable in a variety of access methods such as hand access, switch scanning, and eye gaze technology. The occupational therapist will specifically look at:

  • the child’s overall posture and strength to allow for upper extremity (or any other extremity) use while accessing the communication system
  • determine optimal positioning of both the child and the device to ensure the most efficient method of access
  • the child’s vision, auditory, and sensory processing needs
  • the child’s visual and/or auditory scanning ability
  • the child’s visual/auditory tolerance
  • any adaptations to engage different sensory systems, as well as monitor for sensory overload and/or assist in sensory regulation for device access.

The speech therapist is extremely knowledgeable in the vast array of AAC communication systems and AAC strategies available. They will help determine the communication system and language page best suited to bridge the gap between the child’s receptive and expressive communication skills. The evaluations are done in a play based manner to help the child feel comfortable. And play is how children learn!

DSC_1Here at Easterseals we offer a team approach for evaluating children for AAC needs. For children that could additionally benefit from AAC, we will see them for co-treats to help expand their language within play based therapy sessions.

When the child’s specific goal is to assist in overall regulation and play to support device access, then a co-treat can be extremely valuable between Occupational Therapy and Speech Therapy. OTs are trained in setting up sensory rich environments to support regulation and drive play. These activities can be very motivating for your child’s communication. There are endless opportunities to model language depending on your child’s unique development.

To learn more about Assistive Technology at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley, click here. 

 

Additional resources: www.speechscience.org

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Comparing School & Clinic Speech Services

By: Valerie Heneghan, M.A. CCC-SLP/L
Speech Department Manager

 As a speech-language pathologist who has worked both in school-based and clinical settings, I am often asked questions about the difference between these two settings. Overall, they work together! I’ll explain more.

School-based setting

Qualifications

girls on desk looking at notebook
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Schools have entrance and exit criteria for qualifying children for speech services derived by their district or state. Using formal assessment protocols, children may need to demonstrate a deficit of a pre-set standard deviation before they are eligible for services.  There is usually a wide range of differences from district to district, so it is difficult to predict qualification criteria prior to the evaluation.

Services:

School services can treat children with language, articulation, pragmatic (i.e., social), and voice/fluency disorders to make educational progress. These services may be delivered in a variety of ways including one-on-one, group setting, or push-in to the classroom.

A Clinic-based setting (like at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley)

Qualifications

Clinics typically do not have pre-set qualification criteria as they are not regulated by state or governing bodies.  Clinicians will qualify children for services based on clinical judgement using both formal and informal assessment procedures. Coverage for these services however may be dependent on the child’s insurance and/or may be an out of pocket expense.

Services

speech therapist.jpgClinics may be able to provide more specialized, intensive, or varied skilled services based on functional and/or medical necessity. Often these services are delivered on a one-on-one setting in the clinic, however additional options may be available.

Easterseals

At Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley , we offer a variety of service delivery models including: one-on-one therapy, community base therapy (groups), co-treatment with multiple services, tele-therapy services in addition to providing services in our clinic, homes, and through our daycare setting.

We deliver a wide range of speech-language services cultivated by upholding ongoing continued education/ certifications, state of the art equipment, and collaboration with multidisciplinary teams.  Our speech-language services work to strengthen children’s communication and feeding skills so that they can participate fully in daily activities and achieve success.

Our speech-language therapy services address functional communication, language expression/comprehension, pragmatics, speech-sound production, voice, fluency, oral motor, and feeding skills. Areas of specialization include but are not limited to the following:

  1. The Voice Box: A Motor Speech Lab, focuses on improving articulation, voice and resonance skills through cutting edge and innovative technology.
  2. Oralfacial Myology addresses disorders of the muscles and functions of the mouth and face. These may address tongue thrust, dental malocclusions, breathing, speech, swallowing, and chewing.
  3. Feeding services seek to ensure safety and adequate consumption of a varied diet. Treatment may address feeding issues related towards chronic diseases or syndromes, disorders of oral motor structure or development, growth disorders, failure to thrive or obesity, tube feedings, food allergies and sensitivities, gastrointestinal disorders, neurological conditions, constipation, diarrhea, sensory-related or Autism Spectrum Disorder-related feeding difficulties.

Voice Box Photo 3Our services continue to expand to meet the needs of the current populations that we serve.  Additional initiatives that we have been growing this year include: tongue/lip ties, auditory processing, and Spell-Links for improving spelling and reading comprehension.

I see value in both school and clinical settings!  I often encourage families that I work with, to consider both options based on the needs of the child.  Our therapists work with other disciplines like our Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Audiology or Nutrition teams. We make sure to consult and involve all medical professionals and school therapists that work with a child, to  review goals and achieve maximal outcomes. To learn more about Speech-Language services at Easterseals DuPage & Fox Valley visit http://www.easterseals.com/dfv/our-programs/medical-rehabilitation/speech-language-therapy.html.

The Interactive Metronome

By: Kara Lyons, OT

blog12TIMING IS EVERYTHING
Did you know that precise timing is responsible for the synchronous interaction within our brain that connects physical movement and cognitive processes?

Why is timing important? To name a few, timing is responsible for a person’s ability to walk without falling, catch or throw a ball, jump, climb a ladder, play music, and speak without stuttering.

Research suggests that training with the Interactive Metronome, or IM, supports the interaction between critical brain networks, specifically the parietal-frontal lobes, which are often associated with general intellectual functioning, working memory, controlled attention, and executive functions (McGrew, 2002).

What is the Interactive Metronome (IM)?

The IM is a computer based interactive program that provides a timed rhythmical beat, or metronome, which works to pace an individual’s movements.

In this program, an individual synchronizes a variety of upper and lower extremity exercises to a precise computer-generated tone heard through headphones.

The IM responds to a client’s physical movement by providing real-time auditory and visual feedback in milliseconds, indicating whether they are in sync with the beat, or they are too early or late.

blogggg1What skills does the IM target?

• Improved timing, rhythm, and synchronization in the brain
• Motor planning, motor control, and bilateral coordination
• Attention, working memory, and processing speed
• Speech/language and social skills

Who could benefit from the IM?28321120_Unknown (1)

Pediatric population
Individuals with ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Processing Disorder, children with developmental delays or learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, auditory processing disorder, and dyslexia.
Adult population
Post brain injury, stroke, or concussions, adults with ADHD, Parkinson’s Disease, Alzheimer’s/Dementia, and amputees

How do you get started with this program?

• The first step is to be evaluated by an occupational, speech, or physical therapist that is also trained and certified as an Interactive Metronome Provider. You may find a provider in your area through the Interactive Metronome’s locator index.

• The assessment will consist of a comprehensive speech, occupational, or physical therapy evaluation, including an IM assessment, information sharing with the family and evaluating therapist, clinical observations, and other objective measures or evaluation tools (which may provide additional information regarding strength, coordination, fine and visual motor control, and/or speech and language abilities). At that time, the evaluating therapist will identify concerns expressed by the family and work to establish functional goals for the child.
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• The IM assessment provides data on the child’s current level of functioning, including their timing tendencies, attention to task, their ability to motor plan, sequence, or coordinate the movement patterns.
• The evaluating or treating therapist will determine if the client is appropriate for the program before customizing a treatment plan and program.

• REPETITION and FREQUENCY are critical for making lasting, functional changes in the brain.

• It is recommended that a client participate in the program at least 3 times per week for a minimum of 30 minutes of training per session.

THE IM HOME UNIT

blog123The IM home training unit is an option for families to meet the minimum recommended frequency or if the client is unable to attend therapy in the clinic setting.

To purchase and utilize the IM home program, a client must establish a relationship with an IM home certified therapist (also available through the IM Locator Index). The treating therapist will customize the child’s treatment plan, provide ongoing feedback, and adjust the plan as needed.

Overall, the IM is an excellent adjunct to traditional therapy services as it provides objective data (the child’s performance over time, measured in milliseconds) to support functional outcomes. If you are interested in the Interactive Metronome or feel it may be appropriate for your child, speak with your treating therapist.

For more information on the Interactive Metronome, including evidence to support the program, please visit https://www.interactivemetronome.com

To learn more about Interactive Metronome services at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley and set up an evaluation contact us.

 

 

References:
McGrew, Kevin (2002). The Science behind the Interactive Metronome: An Integration of Brain Clock, Temporal Processing, Brain Network, and Neurocognitive Research and Theory. MindHub Pub, 2.

The Amazon Echo as an Accessibility Support

By: Judy Gardner, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Pathologist/Feeding Therapist

Amazon describes the Echo as a hands-free, voice-controlled device that uses Alexa (Amazon’s answer to Siri, Cortana and Google) to play music, control smart home devices, provide information, read the news, set alarms, and more.  It is exciting that people’s interactions with a computer device is much easier with no buttons to find and press.  The speech recognition still has some limitations but devices like the Echo show what the future may be around the corner.  The Echo works by constantly listening to a trigger word, by default, the trigger word is “Alexa” but you can change it in the Alexa app on your mobile device.    The communication devices we use in assistive technology allow a non-verbal child, or the child with some difficulty in oral speech to use the Echo independently.

Relationship Coordinator, Amy Liss, really enjoys this new device. “This is the most beneficial piece of technology I have ever received that can help me be completely independent.” Her favorite feature is playing daily Jeopardy trivia.

Some of these many uses:

Get quick answers for simple Web searches:  The most basic use of the Echo is to ask it questions it can answer by searching on the Web.  This ranges from simple math (Alexa what is 125 times 33?”) or spelling and definitions, etc.  The Echo is unique in that it will say the answers out loud  rather than requiring the user to read the responses.

Set alarms and timers:  So children with executive functioning is ability to self-regulate, including the ability to stay on task and manage and keep time.  For example, you can set a timer for someone to do an activity for one hour (“Alexa set a timer for one hour”) then set a second timer for each separate step that needs to be completed to accomplish the assigned task during that hour.  Just say “Alexa set a second timer for 25 minutes.  So you can have a 5 minute break.

Manage a to do list:  Just say “Alexa, add (name of to do item) to my to do list, or remind me to (name of task).”

Update your calendar:  “Alexa, add (event name) to my calendar.”  Gives the ability to stay organized.

Get your daily news fix:  (“Alexa, give me my Flash Briefing”)

Listen to Audible and Kindle books:  The Echo is a great way to listen to your books read aloud.  This can be a great way to use the Echo in the classroom setting.

wemoControl your lights:  Echo can be great way to control your home lighting using just your voice.  This can be especially helpful for those who have motor difficulties.  By installing the Hue Skill, you can get basic voice control of the lights in your home.

Control your appliances:  With a Wemo switch you can add voice control to any small appliance with an on/off switch (fans, lamps, etc.)

Listen to music and podcasts:  Echo supports a number of music services.

There are many more thing you can do with the Echo.  For more details go to www.luisperezonline.com for full details.  If you have a voice that is difficult to understand, have no fear- Alexa can use many speech generating devices to the rescue.

The Assistive Technology department at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley has received a grant to install Amazon Echo in their department.  Once it is installed we hope that you all will come down and give it a try.  Learn more about our assistive technology department by clicking here.

Screen Time: What is too much?

By: Cassidy McCoy, PT

Over the past few years, computers, tablets, phones, and TV seem to have taken over. Technology has begun to change the way our children interact with each other and us. However, how much time spent on these devices is considered too much?

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released new recommendation for children’s media use.

The recommendations include:

  • <18 months: Avoid use of screen media other than video-chatting.
  • 18 to 24 months: If you want to introduce digital media, choose high-quality programming. Also, watch it with your children to help them understand what they’re seeing.
  • 2 to 5 years: Limit your children’s screen use to 1 hour per day of high-quality programs. You should watch it with them to help them understand what they are seeing and apply it to the world around them.boy-learning-with-therapist
  • 6 and older: Place consistent limits on the time spent using media, the types of media, and make sure media does not take the place of adequate sleep, physical activity and other behaviors essential to health.

What are the potential effects of too much screen time?

  • Obesity: Too much screen time equates to more time spent in sedentary positioning resulting in decreased physical activity and weight gain. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommend for children to get at least 60 minutes of active play daily.
  • Sleep: Devices emit a blue light that mimics daylight, which stimulates you, leading to irregular sleep schedules and shorter duration of sleep with use of a device before bedtime.
  • Behavioral problems and violence: Screen time can be an effective way to calm down, but it should not be the only way they learn to calm down. Children should learn how to identify and handle strong emotions and come up with ways to manage them (such as deep breathing or problem solving)
  • Loss of social skills: Face-to-face communication or “talk time” is critical for language development. Research has shown that it’s that “back-and-forth conversation” that improves language skills—much more so than “passive” listening or one-way interaction with a screen.

What can you to to help?

  • Set time limits and expectations
  • Create “tech free zones” such a dinner table or bedrooms
  • Use screen time to promote education and development by utilizing appropriate programming.

For more information on Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit, eastersealsdfvr.org.

My Favorite Apps for Creativity and Interaction

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons M.S. CCC-SLP

Screen time for the purpose of passive consumption should be limited, as it does not activate a young child’s brain the way that real interaction with another person does.  Children learn most efficiently from back and forth communication, interaction in the real world and hands on play.

However, the screen can be a platform to promote back and forth interaction between a caregiver and child.  starblogHere are my favorite apps that promote creativity, collaboration and FUN interaction:

Video Star lets you easily create a music video in which you are the star!  Select the song, special effects, start shooting and then watch back the hilarious video that you created!

Songify transforms your recorded speech into a song.  It is SO FUN!!!songifyblog-copy

Puppet Pals is an app in which you can create your own unique puppet shows.  You can select the actors, background, animation and record the audio.

funnymovieblog-copyFunny Movie Maker lets you replace the mouth (or entire face) of a picture of a friend, celebrity, pet, etc.  You can record videos, adjust the pitch of your voice and add music to complete your video.   I think this could be an entertaining way to get that articulation homework done!

Book Creator is a simple way to make your own book right on you tablet.  In this app, you can customize books by adding pictures, text, video clips, music and even your own recorded voice.  What a great way for a child to re-tell a previous event or create bookcreatorblog-copytheir own imaginative story!

As with all media use, play these games along with your child. These apps may spur your creativity too!

To learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

Occupational Therapist Recommended iPad Apps

By: Laura Bueche, MOT OTR/L

No one can deny the powers of the iPad. The back lit animations, sound effects and interactive games make apps a great tool for kids to learn. Kids and adults are drawn to the technology?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting the amount of screen time a child has to “high-quality content.” They recommend children and teens should engage with entertainment media for no more than one or two hours per day and that television and other entertainment media should be avoided for infants and children under age 2.

But what games or content are high-quality? As a pediatric occupational therapist, I use iPad apps during therapy as a therapeutic tool to help kid’s develop skills.  Below are my favorite quality iPad apps.

Fine Motor Skills

Dexteria

 

Dexteria By: Binary Labs, Inc.
Price: $3.99

Dexteria turns your iOS device into a therapeutic tool that improves fine motor skills and handwriting readiness in children and adults.

dexteria jr

Dexteria Jr. By: BinaryLabs, Inc.
Price: $2.99

Set of hand and finger exercises to develop fine motor skills and handwriting readiness. The activities are specially designed for kids age 2-6.

dottodot

Dot to Dot Numbers and Letters Lite By: Apps in My Pocket Ltd By Apps in My Pocket Ltd
Price: Free

Trace through dot-to-dot puzzles for visual motor skills and visual tracking.

bugsandbuttons

Bugs and Buttons By: Little Bit Studio, LLC.
Price: $2.99

18 mini-games and activities that make learning fun. Count colorful buttons, recycle with marching ants or dainty ladybugs, recognize letters, solve bug mazes, and more!

 

Letter and Number Formation

letter&amp;number2 letter&amp;number

Letter School By: Letterschool Enabling Learning B.V.
Price: $4.99

Play to learn how to write all letters of the alphabet: abc – xyz and the numbers 1-10 with LetterSchool.

letterworkbook

Letter Workbook Home Edition By: BigCleaverLearning
Price: Free

Letter Workbook is an interactive educational app which teaches toddlers and children how to form and write letters. Through the simple, interactive guide children will learn how to write their ABC, improve vocabulary and have fun along the way!

myfirst number trace

My First Number Trace By: Neutre
Price: $1.99

Easy tracing for little fingers. Trace letters 1-10.

iwritewords

iWriteWords By: gdiplus
Price: $2.99

iWriteWords teaches your child handwriting while playing a fun and entertaining game.

 

Visual Perception

littlethings

Little Things By: KLICKTOCK
Price: $2.99

An innovative seek and find game. Search colorful collages built from thousands of little things. Randomized searches ensure a different game each time you play.

rushhour

Rush Hour Free By: Thinkfun Inc.
Price: Free

The original sliding block Traffic Jam puzzle, works on visual perception, problem solving, and attention.

 

visual attention
Visual Attention Therapy By: Tactus Therapy Solutions Ltd. Price: $9.99

Visual Attention Therapy helps brain injury and stroke survivors, as well as struggling students, to improve scanning abilities. It also helps rehab professionals to assess for neglect and provide more efficient and effective therapy for attention deficits.


Cause and Effect Apps

peekaboo

Peekaboo Forrest, Barn, or Fridge By: Night & Day Studios, Inc.
Price: $1.99

If you see something moving, tap on it to find out who it is!

ilovefireworks

Ilovefireworks lite By: Fireworks Games

Price: Free

Create beautiful fireworks display by easy tap operation! Touch on the screen, you immediately see breath taking fireworks in 3D graphics and real sounds.

touchofmusic

Touch of Music By: gamegou

Price: Free

Enjoy the freedom to play songs at your own beat while never missing a note.

 

Self Care Skills 

idohygiene

IdoHygiene By: C.E.T – THE CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
Price: Free

Learn the most common personal hygiene daily activities (teeth brushing, shampooing , hand washing, toilet training, taking a shower , public bathroom, etc.)

t-rex

T-Rex Toothbrush Timer By: PCAppDev Limited
Price: $0.99

Encourage your kids to brush their own teeth properly by following Dino brush his teeth!!

To learn more about Occupational Therapy at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley visit eastersealsdfvr.org.

Frank in therapy

Screen Time Recommendations for Kids

By: Jessica Drake-Simmons, M.S. CCC-SLP

Technology is an increasingly present and necessary tool in every aspect of our lives.  Yet, the use of screens has been discouraged for children, especially young children.  Until recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended avoiding screen time for children under the age of 2 and limiting screen time to less than 2 hours for children over the age of 2.  It is clear that these are unobtainable standards for many American families as the average child is spending seven hours a day in front of entertainment media.

The American Academy of Pediatrics established these strict guidelines due to research that has shown media can lead to difficulties with attention, school, sleep and obesity.  What is now being acknowledged are the many variables related to the quality of screen time a child is exposed to.  Screen time comes in three forms:

  • Consumption- passively watching a TV show

consumption

  • Creation- researching a topic, creating a presentation

creation

  • Communication- Facetime with Grandma, writing a text message

communication

Screen time for the purpose of creation and communication is typically a beneficial activity.  Screen time for the purpose of passive consumption is what needs to be more closely monitored, as it does not activate a young child’s brain the way that real interaction with another person does.  Children learn most efficiently from back and forth communication, interaction in the real world and hands on play.  However, the screen can be a platform to promote back and forth interaction between a caregiver and child.

Research is clear on what to AVOID:

  1. Background TV– leads to decreased parent-child interaction, poorer play and decreased executive functioning ability
  2. Fast paced screens– temporarily impairs young children’s executive functioning skills
  3. Media before bed– the effect of the neurologically stimulating screen can make it difficult for children to go to sleep

The American Academy of Pediatrics is changing their recommendations for screen time and the complete guidelines will be released in 2016 here.

Learn more about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley at EasterSealsDFVR.org.

Finding Our Voice With New Speech Technology: Part 2

By: Jennifer Tripoli M.S., CCC-SLP

In my previous blog post, I introduced the Voice Box, a motor speech lab that houses equipment related to voice, resonance, and articulation. The first post was primarily centered around the Smart Palate technology by Complete Speech. Now I am here to tell you more about the other stars of the Voice Box, the Nasometer and the Visipitch.

Nasometer by KayPENTAX

speech tech 2 speech tech 1

Above pictures include computer with headset (worn by client) that takes nasalance measurement.

So what is the Nasometer? 

  • The Nasometer is an evaluation and treatment device that is able to objectively measure nasality (resonance) in a client’s speech.
  • Prior to this piece of equipment, clinicians were using their own perception or ear to determine if a client had a nasality problem. This takes the guess work out!

    Voice Box 2 Photo Credit Rich Howe
                        Photo by Rich Howe
  • Provides a nasalance score that objectively measures nasality.
  • Helps clinicians determine if further evaluation is needed to assess the velopharyngeal port by ENT or craniofacial clinic.
  • Allows clinicians to objectively measure progress in therapy for children with resonance disorders by improvements in nasalance scores.

Who would benefit from this technology?

  • Children with suspected nasality problems or resonance issues
  • Children with a:
    • Cleft palate
    • Deficiencies in the velopharyngeal port
    • Neuromotor/motor speech deficits
    • Hearing impairment
  • How is it used in treatment?
    • The Nasometer has biofeedback games that can be used in treatment and allow the child to practice appropriate resonance in real time speech.
    • The child is able to make adjustments based on feedback they are receiving in fun, highly motivating computer game.

Visipitch by KayPENTAX

The Visipitch can be used for a variety of skills and has various programs targeting different aspects of speech.

What does it do?

  • The visipitch is an all-encompassing instrumentation that gives real time displays for visual feedback of critical speech/voice parameters.
  • Contains 8 modules all used for different/various speech skills.

How do we use this technology at Easter Seals DuPage and Fox Valley?

We mainly use the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) to evaluate voice disorders contained in Visipitch software and Voice Games.

  • Gives clinician’s objective quantitative measures for voice analysis which can be compared to normal levels
  • Clinicians can measure progress in therapy based on improvements in quantitative measures provided by MDVP.

Who would benefit from this piece of equipment?

  • Children/adults with voice disorders
  • Children with vocal nodules or other vocal fold pathology
  • Children with hoarse, breathy , or harsh vocal quality
  • Children with motor speech disorders including apraxia and dysarthria

How is it used in treatment?

  • Visipitch contains a variety of highly motivating voice games to be used in treatment
  • Voice games are very visual and rewarding for children demonstrating good speech and voice behaviors
  • Voice games work on sustained phonation, frequency/pitch of voice, amplitude/loudness of voice, voice onset, etc.

The frog game (below) . Child is asked to sustain phonation or hold out voice to expand frog’s throat. If child holds out voice until frog’s throat expands, they are awarded with a visual reinforcement on the screen.

speech tech 3speech tech 4

Dragon/Fire game (below). Child is asked to use low to loud vocal volume to pop all the balloons with the dragon’s fire. This game works on vocal loudness and ability to control vocal loudness.

Voice Box 1 Photo Credit Rich Howe
Photo by Rich Howe.

speech tech 5

Of course, these pieces of equipment are never used solely in treatment. All equipment is used in addition to traditional speech treatment!

If you have questions or are interested in having your child evaluated for use of the Voice Box, please contact our intake coordinator at 630.282.2022.

The Voice Box has been a wonderful addition to the Speech and Language Department at Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley! We are forever grateful to the generous donors who made this possible! Thank you again!

Interactive Metronome

By: Laura Van Zandt, OTR/L

Did you know that our brains have an “internal clock” that keeps time? This timing is critical for attention, executive functions, speech and language, social skills, reading and other academic skills, motor control and coordination, sensory processing and integration, as well as many other areas common to childhood development.

Interactive metronome is an evidence-based, intensive computer centered assessment and training tool that can help improve timing, rhythm, and synchronization in the brain. Interactive metronome is used around the globe in hospitals, pediatric and adult clinics, school, and homes.  It can be used to improve a child’s processing abilities that affect attention, motor planning, sensory processing, and sequencing. Children who have been diagnosed with ADHD/ADD, Apraxia/Dyspraxia, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Brain Injury, Auditory Processing Disorder, Cerebral Palsy, Dyslexia, Language-Learning Disorders, Non-Verbal Learning Disorders, Sensory Processing Disorder, Stuttering, and much more can all benefit.

The goals of Interactive Metronome include:

  • Improve independence with activities of daily living
  • Improve physical endurance and stamina for performance in sports and leisure activities
  • Improve overall whole body coordination
  • Improve focus and attention for longer periods of time related to daily function and filtering out internal as well as external distractions
  • Improve academic function performance and ability to follow directions
  • Improve self-esteem and social skills
  • Improve behavior and impulsivity

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Interactive Metronome is available through Easter Seals DuPage Occupational, Physical, and Speech Therapy Departments. The therapists at Easter Seals use this program to tailor a treatment plan specific to the child’s needs and family priorities. Interactive Metronome challenges the child to precisely match a rhythmic beat, which can be customized to your child’s unique learning style and challenges, with synchronized hands and feet exercises. Feedback is then is given auditorally or visually based on the child’s goals that tell the child how close they are within milliseconds to the reference tone. This feedback guides the child to attend and problem solve how to stay to the beat for improving their timing and overall coordination.

During Interactive Metronome, the child treatment activities can be customized based on your individual child’s areas of needs. Exercises can include working on crossing midline for integrating both sides of the body together, improving standing balance for strengthening and endurance, improving both upper and lower extremity range of motion for reach and gait, improving impulse control by ignoring specific stimuli, improving attention to increasing longer and more complex exercises, improving working memory  by recalling a series of exercises to shift between with either upper extremities, lower extremities or both, as well as improving coordination tasks with all extremities. The goals of Interactive Metronome are vast and largely customization.

If your child if already enrolled in therapy, talk to your therapist about this exciting new opportunity! If you are not currently enrolled in therapy, discuss this with your pediatrician and obtain a script for a discipline specific evaluation and treatment.

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“Interactive Metronome helps me coordinate things. It helps me get better going to the speed of things and getting used to more things. I feel proud of myself and all of my great work and effort. I even ask my parents if they can order it for me.”

More information can be obtained from www.interactivemetronome.com. For more information about Easter Seals DuPage & Fox Valley please visit EasterSealsDFVR.org.